Ways to Give



To make a gift or pledge online, please complete our secure online giving form.


To speak to someone directly about making a gift, please call 443-287-7947.


Mail your tax-deductible contribution made payable to 'Johns Hopkins University' to:
Robert Kahl
Department of Pathology
Johns Hopkins Medicine
600 N. Wolfe Street, Carnegie 424
Baltimore, MD 21287-6417


Questions about other types of gifts?
Learn about making other types of charitable gifts to the Department of Pathology or
contact our Development Office at 443-287-7947 or FJHMDeptPrograms@jhmi.edu.


Funding BrochureFor more than 125 years, the Department of Pathology has continued the traditions of excellence in research and teaching begun by William H. Welch, M.D., the first Professor of Pathology at Johns Hopkins. Even before the hospital opened its doors in 1889 and the School of Medicine welcomed its first class of medical students in 1893, the Johns Hopkins Department of Pathology has been at the forefront of medical research and education.

The story of Johns Hopkins is at its heart a story of philanthropy. Johns Hopkins Medicine owes its existence—and its continuing excellence—to the generosity of private individuals. While most investigators in the Department of Pathology receive some level of government funding, contributions from private individuals, foundations, and corporations provide investigators with the additional funding that is crucial in helping to continue the quality of teaching and patient care for which Johns Hopkins Medicine is known. More importantly, philanthropic contributions provide the critical support that investigators need in order to pursue novel and potentially high-impact research that challenge the frontiers of medicine for the benefit of all—now and in the future, here at Johns Hopkins and around the world.

In the Department of Pathology at Johns Hopkins, we have the great, good fortune to have had some of the world's most accomplished physician-scientists as members of our faculty. In addition to the significant impact they have had on their respective fields, these men and women were extraordinary teachers and mentors to generations of pathologists.

It is to honor the achievements of these remarkable men and women, and to ensure that a permanent source of funding is available to support the training and research of the young pathologists who follow in their footsteps that the endowed funds described below have been established.

Your tax-deductible contribution to any of these endowed funds honors our past and helps to fund our future.
Thank you for your investment and partnership.



Learn More About Our Funds & Endowments:

The Patricia Charache, M.D. Clinical Microbiology Fund: Support a Fellow in Microbiology +

The Patricia Charache, M.D. Clinical Microbiology Fund

Patricia Charache, M.D.The Patricia Charache Clinical Microbiology Fund, an endowed fund in the Department of Pathology which provides fellowship support in the Division of Microbiology, was established to pay tribute to Patricia Charache, M.D., D(ABMM), a nationally and internationally known infectious diseases specialist and medical microbiologist who practiced at Johns Hopkins Medicine for more than 50 years. Pat received her bachelor's degree from Hunter College and her medical degree from the New York University School of Medicine. It was during medical school that she began her lifelong love of microbiology. After medical school, Dr. Pat (as she was affectionately known by colleagues and trainees) completed an internship in internal medicine at the Baltimore City Hospitals (now Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center) and then completed research and clinical fellowships at the University of Pennsylvania, the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and the Harvard University School of Medicine, Children's Hospital. She returned to Johns Hopkins in 1964 where she started her career as an instructor in the School of Medicine's Division of Infectious Diseases. Over the next five decades, she served in multiple positions of increasing responsibility—some of them concurrently. When the microbiology laboratory was part of the Department of Medicine, Pat served as its medical director and continued to serve as the director of the division and its various laboratories for 20 years after the microbiology division became part of the Department of Pathology. Under her direction, the laboratory grew and obtained national recognition, added faculty members and organizational structure, expanded services such as virology and molecular diagnostics, and was responsible for launching an active applied research program.

Promoted to full professor in 1992, Pat was the 30th woman to reach that rank in the history of the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and went on to hold the positions of Deputy Director of Clinical Affairs' Physician Advisor and Director of Quality Improvement for the Department of Pathology; Director of the Park Medical Laboratories; and an 18-month tenure as the Director of the Department of Pathology, Zayed Military Hospital and associated hospitals, Abu Dhabi, UAE. Beginning in 1998, until her retirement in 2010, Pat served as program director of Quality Assessment and Outcomes Research Programs. Her early research interests involved the detection of genetic abnormalities using immunologic approaches. Later in her career, she focused on developing approaches to detect microbial pathogens, including AIDS and tuberculosis. An innovator, Pat developed a novel 19-test, agar-based, computer-assisted method of bacterial identification and susceptibility testing which revolutionized testing and was in use in the clinical laboratory for 30 years.

A gifted teacher, valued mentor, and exemplary researcher, Pat also held the title of Distinguished Professor Emerita of pathology, medicine and oncology in the School of Medicine, and a joint appointment in the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Throughout her career at Johns Hopkins, she worked tirelessly and courageously to advocate for the professional development of all faculty members, especially women, and mentored many as they advanced in their careers. Pat published over 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts and more than a dozen books or book chapters, and continued to be an active member of the pathology and microbiology fields until her death on September 12, 2015.

If you would like to honor Dr. Pat Charache's legacy, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution in her memory to the Patricia Charache Clinical Microbiology Fund through the Department of Pathology's secure online giving form by clicking here.


The Joseph C. Eggleston Fund in Surgical Pathology: Support for Surgical Pathology Trainees +

The Joseph C. Eggleston Fund in Surgical Pathology

 Joseph C. Eggleston The Joseph C. Eggleston Fund in Surgical Pathology was established in December 2000 with an anchor gift from Dr. Eggleston's family. This fund honors Joseph C. Eggleston, M.D., a 1962 graduate of the School of Medicine and former Director of Surgical Pathology and Professor of Pathology. Joe was an outstanding teacher whose influence was felt at every level of the medical community—students, housestaff in pathology, physicians in training in other departments, faculty and colleagues. He was a life-long student of human disease and a wonderfully talented diagnostic pathologist. The income from this endowed fund is allocated each year to Surgical Pathology residents or junior faculty members for projects that support their career development. These include research projects or other activities that support their training and careers. Joe died in 1989.

If you would like to honor Dr. Joe Eggleston's legacy, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution in his memory to the Joseph C. Eggleston Fund in Surgical Pathology through the Department of Pathology's secure online giving form by clicking here.

The Yener S. Erozan Fellowship in Cytopathology: Support a Fellow in Cytopathology +

The Yener S. Erozan Fellowship in Cytopathology

Yener S. Erozan The Yener S. Erozan Fellowship in Cytopathology is an endowed fund established in 2000. This fund honors Yener Erozan, M.D., Director Emeritus of the Division of Cytopathology and a past president of the American Society of Cytopathology. The income from the fund supports a fellow in the Division of Cytopathology for research projects that support their career development.

If you would like to honor Dr. Yener Erozan's legacy, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution in his honor to the Yener S. Erozan Fellowship in Cytopathology through the Department of Pathology's secure online giving form by clicking here.

The Robert H. Heptinstall Fellowship Fund: Support a Pathology Fellow +

The Robert H. Heptinstall Fellowship Fund

Robert H. Heptinstall The Robert H. Heptinstall Fellowship Fund was established in February 1999 to honor Robert H. Heptinstall, M.D., former Baxley Professor and Director of Pathology, and author of the classic textbook, "Heptinstall's Pathology of the Kidney." As Baxley Professor and Director, Heppy led the Department from the microscope age into the modern molecular age and served as a mentor to over 200 residents and fellows. The Robert H. Heptinstall Fellowship is designed to promote the research activities or clinical training of outstanding young pathologists pursuing careers in research.

If you would like to honor Dr. Robert Heptinstall's legacy, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution in his honor to the Robert H. Heptinstall Fellowship Fund through the Department of Pathology's secure online giving form by clicking here.

The Gary S. Hill, M.D. Renal Pathology Fund: Support for Trainees in Renal Pathology +

The Gary S. Hill, M.D. Renal Pathology Fund

Gary S. Hill, MDThis endowed fund was established by family and friends in memory of Gary S. Hill, M.D., an internationally renowned renal pathologist and the former Chief of Pathology at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center. Gary graduated from the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine in 1968 and, after completing his residency in pathology in 1972, he became a member of the pathology faculty. An exceptional pathologist from the very beginning of this career, Gary and his bride Martha Norton Hill, an alumnus and later Dean of the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing, honeymooned in an unlikely place—Cambridge, England—when Gary was invited to Cambridge University after receiving an award as "best new investigator" in pathology.

After rising steadily through the ranks in the Department of Pathology, Gary was appointed chief of pathology at Bayview in 1978, just a decade after earning his medical degree, a position he held for 18 years. He continued to teach during his tenure as chief and was highly praised by his students. While at Johns Hopkins, Gary's research in renal pathology revolutionized medicine's understanding of kidney disease where he pioneered new techniques for biopsying the organ's tissue.

In the late 1990s, Gary moved to Paris to become a visiting professor at l'UFR Broussais Hotel-Dieu at Universite de Paris. Fluent in French, he researched and developed a new, expanded method of identifying lupus and its severity. In his career, Gary also wrote a French-English medical dictionary and a textbook on renal pathology that was well received by his colleagues in the field. After returning to Baltimore, Gary died in February 2013.

The Gary S. Hill, M.D. Renal Pathology Fund provides support to medical students, residents, fellows and junior faculty for their research in renal pathology.

If you would like to honor Dr. Gary Hill's legacy, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution in his memory to the Gary S. Hill, M.D. Renal Pathology Fund through the Department of Pathology's secure online giving form by clicking here, choosing 'Other', and designating your gift to 'The Gary S. Hill, M.D., Renal Pathology Fund.'

The Grover M. Hutchins, M.D. Memorial Fund: Research Support for Trainees +

The Grover M. Hutchins, M.D. Memorial Fund

Grover M. Hutchins, MD The friends and family of Grover Hutchins joined together to establish The Grover M. Hutchins, M.D. Memorial Fund. Grover spent 56 years at Johns Hopkins University. He first came to Hopkins in 1949 as an undergraduate in engineering. After serving in the United States Army Medical Corps from 1952-1954, Grover returned to Johns Hopkins where he completed his bachelor's degree and, in 1957, received his medical degree from the School of Medicine. He completed both his internship and residency in the Department of Pathology. Following his residency, Grover joined the Pathology faculty where he went on to become a full Professor and served in a leadership role as Director of Autopsy Pathology from 1976 to 1998. He was a prolific clinico-pathologic researcher, with more than 500 papers published in peer-reviewed journals, as well as hundreds of academic presentations, more than 50 book chapters, and two books. Grover was a tireless champion of the autopsy as a quality assurance, educational, and research tool. Among over 50,000 autopsies performed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital since 1889, he personally examined reports and slides from over one quarter of the cases as part of his research and educational work.

Above all, Grover was an acclaimed educator and medical school teacher until his unexpected death in 2010. Many of the leading academic pathologists today were nurtured by collaborations with him. Grover left behind a magnificent legacy of academic achievement and mentorship. The Grover M. Hutchins, M.D. Memorial Fund honors his legacy by providing research support for trainees and junior faculty in the areas of autopsy, cardiac or pediatric pathology in the Department of Pathology.

If you would like to honor Dr. Grover Hutchin's legacy, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution in his memory to the Grover M. Hutchins, M.D. Memorial Fund through the Department of Pathology's secure online giving form by clicking here.

The Risa B. Mann Fund for Residents: Support Resident Research and Education +

The Risa B. Mann Fund for Residents

Risa B. Mann, M.D.The family, colleagues, and friends of Risa B. Mann, M.D. joined together to create the Risa B. Mann Fund for Residents to honor the life and work of an outstanding physician-scientist. Sadly, Risa died on June 26, 2015. She was a part of the Johns Hopkins family for more than 35 years before her retirement in 2004. Risa obtained her bachelor's and medical degrees from Johns Hopkins University and then completed four years of training in Anatomic Pathology at Hopkins, serving as Chief Resident in the Department of Pathology. After completing a fellowship in Hematopathology at the National Institutes of Health, she returned to Johns Hopkins where she was an active member of the Surgical Pathology service for 27 years. In 1995, Risa was named Professor of Pathology and Oncology, the 44th woman professor named at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and for 17 years served as Director of the Residency Training Program where she mentored the Department's residents and fellows as they embarked on their careers in pathology. A nationally recognized hematopathologist, she served on panels and boards of many professional organizations during her career and received numerous honors such as the Faculty Teaching Award in Pathology.

Throughout Risa's career, she was a staunch supporter and advocate for women in the field of Pathology. For many years, she taught medical students in the Year Two course in Pathology, introducing them to Dorothy Reed, a female pathologist at Johns Hopkins who was involved in recognizing the malignant cell in Hodgkin's Disease. A wife and mother of two, as well as an outstanding academic, Risa served as a role model for young women in medicine by showing them how to achieve success both personally and professionally.

The Risa B. Mann Fund for Residents provides support for resident research and education in the Department of Pathology.

If you would like to honor Dr. Risa Mann's legacy, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution in her memory to the Risa B. Mann Fund for Residents through the Department of Pathology's online giving form by clicking here.

The Donald L. Price Research Fund: Support Research in Neuropathology +

The Donald L. Price Research Fund

Donald Price In honor of Dr. Donald Price's legacy at Johns Hopkins, the Department of Pathology established an endowed fund, The Donald L. Price Research Fund, to support trainees in the Division of Neuropathology.

Don came to Johns Hopkins in 1971 as the Director of the Division of Neuropathology, and Professor in the Departments of Pathology, Neurology, and Neuroscience. Beginning in 1985, he served as the Director of the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center until his retirement in 2007.

For over four decades, Don made important contributions to the understanding of a variety of diseases, particularly peripheral neuropathies, disorders caused by toxins (tetanus toxin, botulinum toxin), and, most significantly, neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) and Parkinson's Disease (PD). Don's major research interest was to move from bedside to bench and back again through the development and analysis of animal models that can be used to examine pathogenic mechanisms, to identify possible therapeutic targets and test novel therapies. These approaches have become particularly important in identifying genes linked to diseases, and in the power of transgenic and knockout approaches to clarify the biology of normal and abnormal gene products in vivo.

Don recruited an outstanding cohort of young scientists to work on neurodegenerative diseases, and it is appropriate that we honor him by building this endowment to support the research of trainees in neuropathology to carry on the outstanding programs he established.

If you would like to honor Dr. Don Price's legacy, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution in his honor to the Donald L. Price Research Fund through the Department of Pathology's secure online giving form by clicking here.

The Mabel Smith Endowment for Resident Research and Education: Support our Residents +

The Mabel Smith Endowment for Resident Research and Education

Mabel Smith The Mabel Smith Endowment for Resident Research and Education was established in November 2004. This fund honors Mabel Smith, former administrator and dedicated member of the Pathology Department's staff for more than 50 years until her retirement in 2013. Income from the fund is used to finance special courses, research projects, travel and other needs for residents in the Department. The recipients of these funds are recognized each year at the Department's annual Awards Dinner. In this small way, we honor Mabel Smith, continue her legacy, and encourage and recognize outstanding research by our resident trainees.

If you would like to honor Mabel Smith's legacy, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution in her honor to the Mabel Smith Endowment for Resident Research and Education through the Department of Pathology's secure online giving form by clicking here.

The John H. Yardley Fellowship in Gastrointestinal Pathology: Support A Fellow in GI Pathology +

The John H. Yardley Fellowship in Gastrointestinal Pathology

John H. Yardley The John H. Yardley Fellowship in Gastrointestinal Pathology was established in April 1999 in honor of John H. Yardley, M.D., former Baxley Professor and Director of Pathology. John's legacy is perhaps best expressed in his teaching of fellows. Over the years, he instilled in his fellows a lifetime love of research, patient care, and teaching. John died in 2011. The John H. Yardley Fellowship promotes the research activities and/or clinical training of promising pathologists pursuing advanced training in the field of gastrointestinal disease in the Department.

If you would like to honor John Yardley's memory, please consider making a tax-deductible contribution in his honor to the John H. Yardley Fellowship in Gastrointestinal Pathology through the Department of Pathology's secure online giving form by clicking here.