Pathology Residency Programs

On the Dome

Overview

The Department of Pathology at Johns Hopkins provides in-depth training in anatomic pathology (AP) and clinical pathology (CP), either combined or individually, to newly graduated M.D.s and those with previous postdoctoral experience. The program is designed to train a well-rounded pathologist through extensive clinical and research experience. House officers receive training in diagnostic anatomic and clinical pathology in a setting of clinical and academic excellence. The department also offers a combined anatomic pathology (AP) and neuropathology (NP) track.

Director of Residency Training Program

Co-Director of Residency Training Program

Medical Training Program Manager


Residency Training


Clinical Training

Residents selecting combined AP and CP training have a fully integrated four-year program developed for their particular interest. In the first two years, all residents are exposed to the major divisions of anatomic and clinical pathology. The first year focuses on AP training, including autopsy, surgical pathology and cytopathology, as well as some CP training. The second year emphasizes introductory rotations in CP. In the ensuing two years, the residents take advanced and elective rotations in both anatomic and clinical pathology. The final year of training provides substantial responsibility in anatomic and clinical pathology, and plenty of opportunities for advances electives and research.

The core AP rotations include:

  • autopsy
  • cytopathology
  • forensic pathology
  • gastrointestinal/liver pathology
  • gynecological pathology
  • surgical pathology
  • molecular diagnostics
  • hematopathology

During the residency, there are multiple elective opportunities for training in the pathology of specific systems, including dermatopathology, neuropathology, renal pathology/electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Most of our AP only residents also elect to have some research experience, that in some cases includes an additional funded year for dedicated research. Numerous endowed funds and a T32 training grant are available to support these research efforts.

The core CP rotations include:

  • clinical chemistry
  • immunology
  • hematology/coagulation
  • management
  • medical microbiology
  • molecular diagnostics
  • transfusion medicine
  • hematopathology

The emphasis in CP is diagnostic interpretation of laboratory tests, interaction with clinical services, and understanding of technical methods, instrumentation, information systems, quality assurance and laboratory management. Additional training consists of rotations and electives that provide further experience in select areas and opportunities for research.

Clinically relevant rotations, in both AP and CP are integrated throughout training, and residents attend and present at departmental and interdepartmental conferences. Several conferences play a major role in the Residency Training Program, including:

  • Weekly didactic sessions in both Anatomic and Clinical Pathology.
  • Weekly surgical pathology case conference.
  • Daily and weekly multiheaded microscope and didactic conferences in surgical pathology and in specialty areas.
  • Weekly work rounds and weekly seminars in clinical pathology.
  • Weekly grand rounds with presentations by faculty, fellows and guest lecturers from within and outside the institution.
  • Research seminars.

During your four years of residency you will complete:

RotationMonth(s)
Autopsy 4
Chemistry2
Consult Service2
Cytopathology3
Dermatopathology1
Forensic Pathology1
GI/Liver Pathology2
Gyn Pathology3
Hematology/Coagulation2
Hematopathology2
Immunology2
Laboratory Management2
Medical Microbiology3
Molecular and Cytogenetics2
Neuropathology1
Surgical Pathology3
Surgical Pathology (SP)6
Transfusion Medicine3
Total Cores
AP Core
CP Core
44
          26
          18
Electives/Research4

Clinical Training

Residents selecting combined AP training have a fully integrated three-year program developed for their particular interest. In the first two years, all residents are exposed to the major divisions of anatomic pathology. The first year focuses on AP training, including autopsy, surgical pathology and cytopathology. In the ensuing two years, the residents take advanced and elective rotations in anatomic pathology. The final year of training provides substantial responsibility in anatomic pathology.

The core AP rotations include:

  • autopsy
  • cytopathology
  • forensic pathology
  • gastrointestinal/liver pathology
  • gynecological pathology
  • surgical pathology
  • molecular diagnostics
  • hematopathology

During the residency, there are multiple elective opportunities for training in the pathology of specific systems, including dermatopathology, molecular pathology, neuropathology, renal pathology/electron microscopy, and immunohistochemistry. Many of our AP only residents chose a more intense research experience that includes electives in research, and in some cases a funded year for dedicated research. Numerous endowed funds and a T32 training grant are available to support these research efforts.

Clinically relevant rotations in AP are integrated throughout training, and residents attend and present at departmental and interdepartmental conferences. Several conferences play a major role in the Residency Training Program, including:

  • Weekly didactic sessions in Anatomic Pathology.
  • Weekly surgical pathology case conference.
  • Daily and weekly multiheaded microscope and didactic conferences in surgical pathology and in specialty areas.
  • Weekly grand rounds with presentations by faculty, fellows and guest lecturers from within and outside the institution.
  • Research seminars.

During your three years of residency you will complete:

RotationMonth(s)
Autopsy 4
Consult Service2
Cytopathology2
Dermatopathology*
Forensic Pathology1
GI/Liver Pathology2
Gyn Pathology3
Hematopathology2
Molecular and Cytogenetics1
Neuropathology*
Surgical pathology (Bayview)3
Surgical pathology (JHH)6
Total Cores26
Electives/Research10
* recommended elective

Clinical Training

Residents selecting CP only training have a fully integrated three-year program developed based on their particular interests with assistance from their faculty mentor. In the first two years, all residents are exposed to the major divisions within Clinical Pathology, with rotations in Chemistry, Hematology/Coagulation, Medical Microbiology and Transfusion Medicine. More specialized experiences are also provided in Hematopathology, Immunology, and Molecular Pathology/Cytogenetics. In the third year, the program includes sufficient time for electives and research allowing the CP only resident an opportunity for further specialization. This final year of training provides substantial responsibility in clinical pathology with leadership in the laboratory. Many of our CP only residents chose a more intense research experience that includes electives in research, and in some cases a funded year for dedicated research. Numerous endowed funds and a T32 training grant are available in the Department to support these research efforts.

Our program provides a unique opportunity to work on an individual basis with faculty members who are leaders in their fields. With extensive rotations throughout the clinical laboratories, the overriding goals of CP training are focused in three specific areas:

  • the science supporting clinical laboratory testing, including technical methodologies and instrumentation,
  • the medical significance and interpretation of test results, requiring interactions with clinical services and an understanding of pathophysiology, and
  • principles of laboratory management, including the role of the medical director, information systems, and quality assurance.

Clinical Pathology residents attend and present at departmental and interdepartmental conferences. Each laboratory has specific conferences providing opportunities for both didactic and active learning in a focused subspecialty area. Additionally, several departmental conferences play a major role in the Clinical Pathology Residency Training Program, including:

  • Weekly didactic sessions in Clinical Pathology.
  • Weekly work rounds addressing the on-call and consultative role of the clinical pathologist.
  • Weekly seminars in clinical pathology.
  • Weekly grand rounds with presentations by faculty, fellows and guest lecturers from within and outside the institution.
  • Quarterly quality improvement forums for residents, providing additional exposure to quality assurance and quality improvement activities.
  • Research seminars.

All house staff participate in the teaching of the pathology course for medical students. Residents have assigned days to teach small groups of students in collaboration with faculty members. CP residents also provide continuing educational experiences for the technical staff in the clinical laboratories.

Throughout the training program, residents assume progressively increasing responsibility for the management of cases under the close supervision of senior residents, fellows and attending faculty members. Two residents from the Pathology program are selected to serve as the Chief Residents in Pathology.

Our department offers several fellowship programs allowing for further specialized training. Recent graduates hold faculty positions in top academic institutions.

During your three years of residency you will complete:

RotationMonth(s)
Chemistry2
Hematology/Coagulation2
Hematopathology2
Immunology2
Laboratory Management2
Medical Microbiology3
Molecular and Cytogenetics2
Transfusion Medicine3
Advanced specialty training as determined by faculty and resident6
Total Cores24
Electives/Research12

Clinical Training

Residents selecting the AP/NP track will undergo rigorous training in anatomic pathology and neuropathology in a fully integrated four-year program developed for their particular interest and leading to AP/NP Board eligibility. The first two years consist of 24 months encompassing the core disciplines of anatomic pathology. In the second two years, residents work as neuropathology fellows and focus exclusively on neuropathology, with 21 months of rotations covering surgical, autopsy, and forensic NP as well as neuromuscular and eye pathology. The final year of training provides substantial responsibility in neuropathology, leadership opportunities and at least 3 months of elective or research time that may be tailored to the fellow's clinical and/or research interests. While research is emphasized and supported, development of the knowledge base and skill set necessary for independent work in diagnostic anatomic and neuropathology is paramount. Previous trainees have built on this foundation in successful careers involving various combinations of surgical pathology and clinical neuropathology as well as research into tumor biology, mechanisms of neurodegeneration, and nervous system development.

For individuals interested in developing a career as independent investigators, additional training opportunities are available through R25 and T32 grants.

NOTE:

Residents who are completing AP training, AP/CP training, or training in a neuro-related clinical discipline (including one year in general Anatomic Pathology) and who are interested in becoming Board-eligible in neuropathology should apply directly to the Division of Neuropathology's two-year fellowship program:
(Neuropathology Training Opportunities, Fellowship Training Programs).

The core AP rotations include:

  • autopsy
  • cytopathology
  • forensic pathology
  • gastrointestinal/liver pathology
  • gynecological/pediatric pathology
  • surgical pathology

Clinically relevant rotations in AP are integrated throughout the first two years of training, and residents attend and present at departmental and interdepartmental conferences. Several conferences play a major role in the Residency Training Program, including:

  • Weekly didactic sessions in Anatomic Pathology.
  • Daily autopsy gross conference.
  • Weekly surgical pathology case conference.
  • Daily and weekly multi-headed microscope and didactic conferences in autopsy and surgical pathology and in specialty areas.

The core NP rotations include:

  • Autopsy neuropathology
  • Surgical neuropathology
  • Neuromuscular laboratory (muscle and medical nerve biopsies)
  • Ophthalmic Pathology
  • Outside elective rotations in pediatric neuropathology

During clinically relevant rotations in NP in the 3rd and 4th year, residents attend and present at departmental and interdepartmental conferences. Several conferences play a major role in the Neuropathology Training Program, including:

  • Weekly didactic sessions in neuropathology.
  • Weekly autopsy neuropathology conference.
  • Weekly multi-headed microscope fellows case conference
  • Weekly neuro-oncology tumor boards
  • Monthly pituitary conference
  • Weekly grand rounds with presentations by faculty, fellows and guest lecturers from within and outside the institution.
  • Research seminars.

The first two years are dedicated to Anatomic Pathology services and you will complete:

RotationMonth(s)
Autopsy 4
Consult Service2
Cytopathology2
Dermatopathology*
Forensic Pathology1
GI/Liver Pathology2
Gyn Pathology2
Hematopathology2
Molecular and Cytogenetics1
Surgical Pathology (Bayview)3
Surgical Pathology (JHH)5
Total Cores24
* elective 

During your second and third year, you will complete:

Neuropathology fellowship
  - Autopsy Neuropathology (including forensic neuropathology)
  - Eye pathology
  - Surgical neuropathology
  - Peripheral nerve and muscle
  - Pediatric neuropathology
Up to 21 months
Elective or research time 3 months (final year)

The department is highly committed to training physician scientists who will use their diagnostic and research skills to shape the future of medicine. Research opportunities are available to all interested Pathology residents. In addition, the department offers positions that provide a funded year of research during residency training. The research year most often taken the year after PGY2 of the 3 year AP-only or CP-only residencies, or after PGY3 of the 4 year AP/ CP residency, but there is flexibility to change this timing. Taking a research year should be approved well in advance by the Residency Program Directors.

Residents will ideally identify a research mentor and begin to formulate a research direction in advance of the year, and several faculty, including Ralph Hruban, Kathleen Burns, Charles Eberhart, and members of the department's Research Advisory Committee (RAC) are available to discuss options for research mentors. There is no obligation to work with faculty whose primary appointments are in our department— the entire Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine is available to residents to explore.

Support for a year of research will be guaranteed by the Department of Pathology. Residents who obtain extramural research funding with salary support below their resident PGY level will receive supplementary salary support from the department or another appropriate source. Residents and clinical fellows in the department with an interest in cancer research are also eligible for our NIH-supported Opportunities for Pathology Trainees in Cancer (OPTIC) research program, which protects time for laboratory-based research experiences for 1 to 3 years. We organize an array of department seminars, career development activities, and social events for physician scientists in training within the department. Our residents are also encouraged to participate in a new, school-wide Physician Scientist Training Program (PSTP) which will be recruiting in 2017.