PhD Program - Intranet for Current Students

PhD Program Group Picture 2018

STUDENT HANDBOOKS

2020 - 2021 Handbook +

Academic Performance  +

Students in the Graduate Program in Pathobiology are expected to perform at a superior level in their coursework and research. In graded courses, all grades must be at the "B" level or above. All grades in pass/fail courses must be "Pass". One grade of "C" in a graded course in an academic year will cause the student to be placed on academic probation. Two grades of "C" in required courses may lead to termination.

The Program Director will provide either written or electronic notice (e-mail) to students on academic probation. The Program Director and other faculty as appropriate will closely monitor students on probation. The condition of probation will be lifted upon successful remediation of unsatisfactory grades. The Program will continue to provide stipend and tuition during academic probation.

The Program Director will provide written notice to terminated students. Termination means that student status will be withdrawn, and stipend and tuition support will cease. Terminated students may apply for reinstatement based upon evidence of academic progress following termination. Applications for reinstatement will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the Executive Committee.

TUTORING

If a student finds that he/she has difficulty in any of the required courses, the student should contact the Pathobiology Program Coordinator immediately. The Program Director will determine if any courses need to be re-taken and will also decide if tutoring or other supportive resources are necessary. If tutoring is recommended, the Pathology Department will pay for the minimum hours required.

HONOR CODE / ETHICS

It is the joint responsibility of faculty and students of the Pathobiology program to maintain the academic integrity of the program in all respects. An ethics code provides definitions and guidelines for students to attain and maintain the highest standards of conduct. Our goal is to encourage and recognize independent thinking by all students. The ethics code requires the whole hearted support of the entire academic community, students and faculty alike, who must accept two kinds of responsibility. Each member must behave honorably and must also take action when necessary to make sure that the program is not injured by misconduct. The Pathobiology program provides a personal copy of the ethics code to every student at enrollment. Once provided with a copy the student has the responsibility of familiarizing himself/herself with the code and all its provisions. A signed copy of the code will be placed in the student's file. Violations of the code include but are not limited to cheating, plagiarism and knowingly furnishing false information about results of research.

CHEATING

Cheating is broadly defined as using or attempting to use someone else's work or ideas in a context where the student is expected to provide his own. Examples of cheating include but are not limited to:

  • Using or referring to notes, books, journal articles, devices, websites or other sources of information during an academic evaluation unless the examination is designated "open book."
  • Copying another student's answers on an academic evaluation or allowing another student to copy answers.
  • Discussing a question or exercise during an academic evaluation.
  • Acting as substitute for another or utilizing another as a substitute during an academic evaluation.

Failure to comply with the designated time limits for an academic evaluation.

PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism is defined as taking for one's own use the words, ideas, concepts or data of another without proper attribution. Plagiarism includes both direct use and paraphrasing of the words, thoughts and concepts of another without proper attribution. Proper attribution includes:

  • Use of quotation marks or single spacing and indentation for words or phrases directly taken from another source accompanied by proper reference to that source.
  • Proper reference to any source from which ideas, concepts or data are taken even if the exact words are not reproduced.

FALSE INFORMATION

Each student is required to keep a day by day record of all of his/her experiments and observations and to report his/her results fully and truthfully. Any changes made in this data record must be fully annotated and explained.


Thesis and Rotations  +

PROCEDURES FOR CHOOSING 1st YEAR ROTATIONS:

  1. Each student will complete 3 research rotations prior to selecting a thesis laboratory. A fourth rotation may be completed if desired.
  2. Upon starting the rotation, students and their rotation mentors will complete the Rotation Plan form.
  3. Upon completion of the rotation, the mentor will provide an evaluation of the student's work.
  4. Students will present their rotation work at the Pathobiology Journal Club or at the annual Pathobiology retreat.
  5. The 3 required rotations must be completed with Pathobiology faculty members. If a student decides to take a fourth rotation with an outside faculty member, it is with the understanding that the student will NOT be able to undertake the thesis in that lab.
  6. Each research rotation will be about 3 months in length, with the exception of summer rotations. A full-time summer rotation (July-August) will be about 2 months in length.
  7. The 3 required rotations must be completed during the first year.
  8. The student must select a thesis advisor no later than 1 year from the date of admission to the program. A student who begins on July 1st should select a thesis lab by June 30th the year following July 1st. **In general, students will not be permitted to conduct their thesis research in a laboratory where they have been previously employed. Any exceptions to this policy will be determined by the Pathobiology Executive Committee.
  9. Interim Advisors: Each student will be assigned an interim advisor during the time period between starting the program and choosing a thesis advisor. The student must meet with the interim advisor AT LEAST once every 4 months. These meetings will be initiated by the student.
  10. Labs with delinquent students should be closed to rotation students until the delinquency is removed.

Rotation Forms


PROCEDURES FOR CHOOSING A THESIS ADVISOR AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE:

After the first year is completed, the student will choose an advisor from the Pathobiology faculty. After completing the Oral Examination for the Ph.D. Degree for the School of Medicine Programs, a Thesis Advisory Committee will be formed to monitor the student's thesis research progress. The student, with the consent of his/her advisor, decides on the composition of the thesis committee. The thesis committee consists of at least three experts in the student's field of study or related fields which MUST include at least one Pathobiology faculty member in addition to the student's mentor. Committee members help with research direction and technical challenges, and oversee the student's progress until research is complete and the doctorate is awarded.

  • There are no limits on the number of members on the Advisory Committee.
  • Once the committee is approved, the student contacts each of the individuals to arrange a mutually agreeable date and time for the first thesis meeting.
  • The thesis meeting is intended to help the student consider the broader concepts on which the thesis research is based, to assist in focusing on the student's research problem, and to clarify any questions concerning the experimental approach.
  • The thesis meeting generally begins with an oral progress report by the student followed by a period of questions, comments, and discussion.

Students must meet with their Committee at least once per year to review progress. More frequent meetings may be desirable to assess progress in research. It is the student's responsibility to schedule these meetings. A written evaluation of the student's progress and development will be prepared by the committee, discussed with the student, and a copy placed in the student's Pathobiology file. For second year students, this meeting should involve primarily a discussion of the proposed thesis. For students in the third and subsequent years, the meeting should involve a discussion of both progress and plans for the future. The Thesis Advisory Committee will decide when the student is ready to begin writing the dissertation. A student whose advisory committee has not met at least once in a year is considered delinquent.

In the event that a student changes thesis labs, the first thesis meeting should be held no later than nine months after joining the new lab. The student, new thesis advisor, and Pathobiology Program Director will formulate a revised timeline for completion of degree based on circumstances.

Per new NIH guidelines, it is required that each student also complete an Individual Development Plan form with his/her mentor each year.

In accordance with Johns Hopkins Time to Degree policy, after completion of year 6, (72 months post-matriculation), meetings must be held semi-annually at which the Pathobiology Program Director, Co-Director, or Curriculum Committee Chair must be present.

Thesis/IDP Forms


TRANSLATIONAL ROTATIONS

The objectives of the rotations are to give the graduate student an interactive exposure with the clinical diagnostic dimension of Pathology. The student should learn the fundamental clinical questions, the current state of the technologies to address these questions, and how basic science can be translated to advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  • After discussion with the faculty regarding the project and dates, student must contact to inform her of the choice of the rotation lab. The rotation must be approved by Dr. Burns. The student must then notify the Program Coordinator () of the rotation prior to its start for registration purposes. Your rotation will not count if you are not registered!
  • A translational rotation should consist of eight 2-hour sessions, or a total of about 16 hours. The student and rotation advisor are responsible for coordinating these hours. The content of the rotation should be decided jointly between the student and advisor. For example, recent rotations have consisted of: student observing clinical diagnosis/sign-out of CNS tumors, student learning how HLA typing is performed, student observing clinical diagnosis/sign-out of infectious disease cases, student observing residents reading frozen sections, slides, surgically resected tissue for diagnosis.
  • Each student must complete 2 translational rotations as a graduation requirement. These should be completed by the end of the student's third year.
  • At the end of the rotation, the student will fill out a translational rotation evaluation, which will be submitted to the Program Coordinator () as documentation of completion of the rotation.
  • The rotation advisor will assign a grade for the rotation using the Preceptor Evaluation of Translational Rotation form.
  • The rotations need not require an experimental project involving bench work. If the student wishes to complete such a project, it should be decided jointly between the student and rotation advisor.

The student is encouraged to interact with the pathology residents and fellows. This will allow communication and strengthen ties between the Pathology residents and fellows and graduate students.

Rotation Forms


DEPARTMENTAL THESIS SEMINAR

Shortly before your submission of graduation materials, you must present your thesis work to the department in a one-hour talk. This is primarily for the department's benefit - everyone deserves to find out what you've been working on all those years.
Some students use this requirement as a way to practice their job talk. Others use it as the first hour of their thesis defense.


Additional Program Information  +

PATHOBIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Students will take all core courses listed as required in Course Descriptions per their academic year, unless otherwise determined by the Program Directors.

ORAL EXAMINATION

The oral examination tests the breadth and depth of the graduate student's scientific knowledge and readiness to begin thesis research. These exams are administered by the Pathobiology program through an oral examination committee. This preliminary oral examination will be scheduled by lottery at the end of the first year meeting with the Program Director. The exam takes place during October after the student has completed all required first year courses.
The committee will consist of 3 members and 1 alternate member selected from within the Pathobiology program faculty, and 2 members and 1 alternate member from Hopkins faculty outside the program. Faculty members are assigned randomly to serve on students' oral exam committees.

The examiners are instructed to test the "breadth and depth" of your knowledge. Questions may cover general principles of biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, bio-organic mechanisms, and/or biophysics. The senior outside faculty member will serve as Chair of the committee (as determined by the Doctoral Board). At the time of the examination the Chair, with consent of the committee, will decide on the format and timing of the exam (generally 1.5-2 hrs). Typically, the candidate is asked to say a few words about their research (at the discretion of the Chair), then is questioned for 10-15 minutes by each committee member.

The result of the examination will be either Unconditional Pass, Conditional Pass, or Fail. A Conditional Pass means that the committee noted a deficit in your background that needs to be addressed to ensure you have the necessary foundation for success. Such a condition should not be taken as a negative judgment on your capacity to succeed, but an opportunity for you to firm up knowledge in a key area. A Fail does not necessarily mean immediate dismissal. Instead, the student is typically given an opportunity to retake the exam with the same or a new committee.

ELECTIVES:

All students in their second year and beyond are required to take a one-semester elective course for credit in each academic year. Courses may be taken for a grade or pass/fail. Students may choose a course offered in the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, or on the Homewood Campus subject to approval by the Program Director. Please note that Grant Writing 101 is a required second year course and does not count as an elective. Teaching in Pathobiology is also not considered an elective.

PATHOBIOLOGY RETREAT:

The annual Pathobiology Retreat, held in early Fall, includes a series of short research talks by senior students and poster presentations by second-year and beyond students. An attending keynote speaker will deliver a special lecture and faculty members and alumni will discuss their research. All members of the Pathobiology Graduate Program are expected to participate in this event. This includes Pathobiology Program Faculty, Graduate Students as well as incoming Pathology House Staff. An invitation is also extended to post- doctoral fellows affiliated with Pathobiology faculty.

SEMINARS, JOURNAL CLUBS, AND LAB MEETINGS

Graduate students are required to attend the weekly Pathobiology Journal Club Course (as of AY 2017-18) and all are expected to attend weekly Pathobiology lunch meetings as well as all lab meetings in their mentor/thesis advisor's departments throughout their training period. Students are encouraged to attend the many seminars presented by invited speakers who are involved in cutting edge research.

PATHOLOGY YOUNG INVESTIGATORS' DAY

Young Investigators' Day (held March/April) provides residents, fellows, and students with the opportunity to present their clinical, basic, or translational research efforts. This activity allows faculty, fellows, residents, and students to learn more about the diverse ongoing research in the Pathology department. All fellows, residents, graduate students and medical students working with a faculty member who holds an appointment in the Department of Pathology are invited to submit abstracts and present posters at the poster session. Preliminary or published data in the areas of Basic Research, Translational Research and Clinical Research are presented. Awards will be presented at the Pathology Awards Ceremony in April/May. (visit PYID website)

GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION POSTER SESSION

The Graduate Student Association Poster Session is held every year. This gives the students the opportunity to showcase their research to both faculty and peers.

STUDENTS OF FACULTY WHO LEAVE THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Students whose thesis advisors/mentors have left Hopkins may continue their project under the Hopkins faculty member and graduate with a Hopkins Ph.D. if they meet all requirements. The thesis advisor/mentor must continue their financial obligations (stipend, insurances, and supplies). If a student moves out of state with the mentor, the student is still considered a Johns Hopkins graduate. The student can waive Hopkins health insurance if covered by a similar plan at the mentor's institution.
It is desirable that students working outside the country or at distant sites within the country return to Hopkins for thesis advisory committee meetings. If that is not possible, however, students will submit written progress reports yearly which will be evaluated by the thesis advisory committee. The committee will then send a written evaluation of the document to the student and place a copy of the evaluation in the student's Pathobiology file.

TRANSFER STUDENTS

Students wishing to transfer into the Pathobiology program from other programs must enter the normal admissions process. Within Hopkins, a student may transfer from another mentor to a Pathobiology faculty mentor in our program with consent of the mentor and the Pathobiology Program Director. The student has to satisfy the Pathobiology coursework requirement to be admitted as an advanced student with permission of the Pathobiology Program Director.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF STUDENTS

The Pathobiology Program provides stipend, tuition, and health and dental insurance for graduate students through their first year of study. At the beginning of the second year, the mentor assumes stipend support as well as individual medical and dental insurance for the student. Pathobiology covers the student's tuition for the duration of their studies. Students are responsible for the ongoing assessment of their student accounts and should bring any discrepancies to the attention of their Program Coordinator in a timely manner in order to correct any issues.

PATHOBIOLOGY PROGRAM COMPLETION AND SOM GRADUATION


PATHOBIOLOGY - COURSES, ROTATIONS, THESIS, ETC.

Students will take all core courses listed as required in Course Descriptions per their academic year, unless otherwise determined by the Program Directors. Students will refer to their individual academic year Student Handbooks for specific academic and procedural requirements. General Pathobiology Program and SOM requirements are stated below.

All students are expected to read and follow guidelines stated in current posted policy available at the following link: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/som/training/graduate-programs/academics/academic-resources/policy-finder.html

LIST OF DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY REGISTRAR FOR GRADUATION:

Documents provided by Program/Student:

  • Completion of degree requirements worksheet signed by student and program director
  • Student's CV
  • Copies of Doctoral Oral Board Exam (all attempts)
  • Abstract of Thesis
  • Names of Advisor and Reader
  • Readers Letter
  • Certificate of Completion
  • Email confirming delivery of thesis to the Library
  • Graduation Clearance Form
  • Completed Survey of Earned Doctorates
  • Proof of completion of Research Ethics requirement if not previously supplied to Registrar

Documents provided by the Registrar's office:

  • Updated Transcript

AWARD OF THE PhD DEGREE:

Johns Hopkins University - administrated by the Doctor of Philosophy Board.

From the Doctor of Philosophy Board website:
There are three fundamental requirements for the Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins University: dissertation, residence, and oral examination. None of these requirements can be modified or changed without unanimous consent of the schools and the Provost.

  1. Dissertation: All Ph.D. students must successfully complete a dissertation in accordance with relevant school and program guidelines prior to degree conferral.
  2. Residence: All Ph.D. students must have completed two consecutive semester of full-time study prior to degree conferral.
  3. Oral Examination: All Ph.D. students must successfully pass a required oral examination conducted by five faculty members. The oral examination must include the chair and at least one other member from outside the candidate's home department.

It is University policy that all Program and University requirements for the Ph.D. must be completed in 9 years or less from start of the Doctoral Program. The Doctor of Philosophy Board reviews all candidates for the Ph.D. prior to conferral to ensure that the fundamental requirements for the Ph.D. have been met within the time frame delineated.




2019 - 2020 Handbook +

Academic Performance  +

Students in the Graduate Program in Pathobiology are expected to perform at a superior level in their coursework and research. In graded courses, all grades must be at the "B" level or above. All grades in pass/fail courses must be "Pass". One grade of "C" in a graded course in an academic year will cause the student to be placed on academic probation. Two grades of "C" in required courses may lead to termination.

The Program Director will provide either written or electronic notice (e-mail) to students on academic probation. The Program Director and other faculty as appropriate will closely monitor students on probation. The condition of probation will be lifted upon successful remediation of unsatisfactory grades. The Program will continue to provide stipend and tuition during academic probation.

The Program Director will provide written notice to terminated students. Termination means that student status will be withdrawn, and stipend and tuition support will cease. Terminated students may apply for reinstatement based upon evidence of academic progress following termination. Applications for reinstatement will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the Executive Committee.

TUTORING

If a student finds that he/she has difficulty in any of the required courses, the student should contact the Pathobiology Program Coordinator immediately. The Program Director will determine if any courses need to be re-taken and will also decide if tutoring or other supportive resources are necessary. If tutoring is recommended, the Pathology Department will pay for the minimum hours required.

HONOR CODE / ETHICS

It is the joint responsibility of faculty and students of the Pathobiology program to maintain the academic integrity of the program in all respects. An ethics code provides definitions and guidelines for students to attain and maintain the highest standards of conduct. Our goal is to encourage and recognize independent thinking by all students. The ethics code requires the whole hearted support of the entire academic community, students and faculty alike, who must accept two kinds of responsibility. Each member must behave honorably and must also take action when necessary to make sure that the program is not injured by misconduct. The Pathobiology program provides a personal copy of the ethics code to every student at enrollment. Once provided with a copy the student has the responsibility of familiarizing himself/herself with the code and all its provisions. A signed copy of the code will be placed in the student's file. Violations of the code include but are not limited to cheating, plagiarism and knowingly furnishing false information about results of research.

CHEATING

Cheating is broadly defined as using or attempting to use someone else's work or ideas in a context where the student is expected to provide his own. Examples of cheating include but are not limited to:

  • Using or referring to notes, books, journal articles, devices, websites or other sources of information during an academic evaluation unless the examination is designated "open book."
  • Copying another student's answers on an academic evaluation or allowing another student to copy answers.
  • Discussing a question or exercise during an academic evaluation.
  • Acting as substitute for another or utilizing another as a substitute during an academic evaluation.

Failure to comply with the designated time limits for an academic evaluation.

PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism is defined as taking for one's own use the words, ideas, concepts or data of another without proper attribution. Plagiarism includes both direct use and paraphrasing of the words, thoughts and concepts of another without proper attribution. Proper attribution includes:

  • Use of quotation marks or single spacing and indentation for words or phrases directly taken from another source accompanied by proper reference to that source.
  • Proper reference to any source from which ideas, concepts or data are taken even if the exact words are not reproduced.

FALSE INFORMATION

Each student is required to keep a day by day record of all of his/her experiments and observations and to report his/her results fully and truthfully. Any changes made in this data record must be fully annotated and explained.


Thesis and Rotations  +

PROCEDURES FOR CHOOSING 1st YEAR ROTATIONS:

  1. Each student will complete 3 research rotations prior to selecting a thesis laboratory. A fourth rotation may be completed if desired.
  2. Upon starting the rotation, students and their rotation mentors will complete the Rotation Plan form.
  3. Upon completion of the rotation, the mentor will provide an evaluation of the student's work.
  4. Students will present their rotation work at the Pathobiology Journal Club or at the annual Pathobiology retreat.
  5. The 3 required rotations must be completed with Pathobiology faculty members. If a student decides to take a fourth rotation with an outside faculty member, it is with the understanding that the student will NOT be able to undertake the thesis in that lab.
  6. Each research rotation will be about 3 months in length, with the exception of summer rotations. A full-time summer rotation (July-August) will be about 2 months in length.
  7. The 3 required rotations must be completed during the first year.
  8. The student must select a thesis advisor no later than 1 year from the date of admission to the program. A student who begins on July 1st should select a thesis lab by June 30th the year following July 1st. **In general, students will not be permitted to conduct their thesis research in a laboratory where they have been previously employed. Any exceptions to this policy will be determined by the Pathobiology Executive Committee.
  9. Interim Advisors: Each student will be assigned an interim advisor during the time period between starting the program and choosing a thesis advisor. The student must meet with the interim advisor AT LEAST once every 4 months. These meetings will be initiated by the student.
  10. Labs with delinquent students should be closed to rotation students until the delinquency is removed.

Rotation Forms


PROCEDURES FOR CHOOSING A THESIS ADVISOR AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE:

After the first year is completed, the student will choose an advisor from the Pathobiology faculty. After completing the Oral Examination for the Ph.D. Degree for the School of Medicine Programs, a Thesis Advisory Committee will be formed to monitor the student's thesis research progress. The student, with the consent of his/her advisor, decides on the composition of the thesis committee. The thesis committee consists of at least three experts in the student's field of study or related fields which MUST include at least one Pathobiology faculty member in addition to the student's mentor. Committee members help with research direction and technical challenges, and oversee the student's progress until research is complete and the doctorate is awarded.

  • There are no limits on the number of members on the Advisory Committee.
  • Once the committee is approved, the student contacts each of the individuals to arrange a mutually agreeable date and time for the first thesis meeting.
  • The thesis meeting is intended to help the student consider the broader concepts on which the thesis research is based, to assist in focusing on the student's research problem, and to clarify any questions concerning the experimental approach.
  • The thesis meeting generally begins with an oral progress report by the student followed by a period of questions, comments, and discussion.

Students must meet with their Committee at least once per year to review progress. More frequent meetings may be desirable to assess progress in research. It is the student's responsibility to schedule these meetings. A written evaluation of the student's progress and development will be prepared by the committee, discussed with the student, and a copy placed in the student's Pathobiology file. For second year students, this meeting should involve primarily a discussion of the proposed thesis. For students in the third and subsequent years, the meeting should involve a discussion of both progress and plans for the future. The Thesis Advisory Committee will decide when the student is ready to begin writing the dissertation. A student whose advisory committee has not met at least once in a year is considered delinquent.

In the event that a student changes thesis labs, the first thesis meeting should be held no later than nine months after joining the new lab. The student, new thesis advisor, and Pathobiology Program Director will formulate a revised timeline for completion of degree based on circumstances.

Per new NIH guidelines, it is required that each student also complete an Individual Development Plan form with his/her mentor each year.

In accordance with Johns Hopkins Time to Degree policy, after completion of year 6, (72 months post-matriculation), meetings must be held semi-annually at which the Pathobiology Program Director, Co-Director, or Curriculum Committee Chair must be present.

Thesis/IDP Forms


TRANSLATIONAL ROTATIONS

The objectives of the rotations are to give the graduate student an interactive exposure with the clinical diagnostic dimension of Pathology. The student should learn the fundamental clinical questions, the current state of the technologies to address these questions, and how basic science can be translated to advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  • After discussion with the faculty regarding the project and dates, student must contact to inform her of the choice of the rotation lab. The rotation must be approved by Dr. Burns. The student must then notify the Program Coordinator () of the rotation prior to its start for registration purposes. Your rotation will not count if you are not registered!
  • A translational rotation should consist of eight 2-hour sessions, or a total of about 16 hours. The student and rotation advisor are responsible for coordinating these hours. The content of the rotation should be decided jointly between the student and advisor. For example, recent rotations have consisted of: student observing clinical diagnosis/sign-out of CNS tumors, student learning how HLA typing is performed, student observing clinical diagnosis/sign-out of infectious disease cases, student observing residents reading frozen sections, slides, surgically resected tissue for diagnosis.
  • Each student must complete 2 translational rotations as a graduation requirement. These should be completed by the end of the student's third year.
  • At the end of the rotation, the student will fill out a translational rotation evaluation, which will be submitted to the Program Coordinator () as documentation of completion of the rotation.
  • The rotation advisor will assign a grade for the rotation using the Preceptor Evaluation of Translational Rotation form.
  • The rotations need not require an experimental project involving bench work. If the student wishes to complete such a project, it should be decided jointly between the student and rotation advisor.

The student is encouraged to interact with the pathology residents and fellows. This will allow communication and strengthen ties between the Pathology residents and fellows and graduate students.

Rotation Forms


DEPARTMENTAL THESIS SEMINAR

Shortly before your submission of graduation materials, you must present your thesis work to the department in a one-hour talk. This is primarily for the department's benefit - everyone deserves to find out what you've been working on all those years.
Some students use this requirement as a way to practice their job talk. Others use it as the first hour of their thesis defense.


Additional Program Information  +

PATHOBIOLOGY COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Students will take all core courses listed as required in Course Descriptions per their academic year, unless otherwise determined by the Program Directors.

ORAL EXAMINATION

The oral examination tests the breadth and depth of the graduate student's scientific knowledge and readiness to begin thesis research. These exams are administered by the Pathobiology program through an oral examination committee. This preliminary oral examination will be scheduled by lottery at the end of the first year meeting with the Program Director. The exam takes place during October after the student has completed all required first year courses.
The committee will consist of 3 members and 1 alternate member selected from within the Pathobiology program faculty, and 2 members and 1 alternate member from Hopkins faculty outside the program. Faculty members are assigned randomly to serve on students' oral exam committees.

The examiners are instructed to test the "breadth and depth" of your knowledge. Questions may cover general principles of biochemistry, cell biology, molecular biology, bio-organic mechanisms, and/or biophysics. The senior outside faculty member will serve as Chair of the committee (as determined by the Doctoral Board). At the time of the examination the Chair, with consent of the committee, will decide on the format and timing of the exam (generally 1.5-2 hrs). Typically, the candidate is asked to say a few words about their research (at the discretion of the Chair), then is questioned for 10-15 minutes by each committee member.

The result of the examination will be either Unconditional Pass, Conditional Pass, or Fail. A Conditional Pass means that the committee noted a deficit in your background that needs to be addressed to ensure you have the necessary foundation for success. Such a condition should not be taken as a negative judgment on your capacity to succeed, but an opportunity for you to firm up knowledge in a key area. A Fail does not necessarily mean immediate dismissal. Instead, the student is typically given an opportunity to retake the exam with the same or a new committee.

ELECTIVES:

All students in their second year and beyond are required to take a one-semester elective course for credit in each academic year. Courses may be taken for a grade or pass/fail. Students may choose a course offered in the Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, or on the Homewood Campus subject to approval by the Program Director. Please note that Grant Writing 101 is a required second year course and does not count as an elective. Teaching in Pathobiology is also not considered an elective.

PATHOBIOLOGY RETREAT:

The annual Pathobiology Retreat, held in early Fall, includes a series of short research talks by senior students and poster presentations by second-year and beyond students. An attending keynote speaker will deliver a special lecture and faculty members and alumni will discuss their research. All members of the Pathobiology Graduate Program are expected to participate in this event. This includes Pathobiology Program Faculty, Graduate Students as well as incoming Pathology House Staff. An invitation is also extended to post- doctoral fellows affiliated with Pathobiology faculty.

SEMINARS, JOURNAL CLUBS, AND LAB MEETINGS

Graduate students are required to attend the weekly Pathobiology Journal Club Course (as of AY 2017-18) and all are expected to attend weekly Pathobiology lunch meetings as well as all lab meetings in their mentor/thesis advisor's departments throughout their training period. Students are encouraged to attend the many seminars presented by invited speakers who are involved in cutting edge research.

PATHOLOGY YOUNG INVESTIGATORS' DAY

Young Investigators' Day (held March/April) provides residents, fellows, and students with the opportunity to present their clinical, basic, or translational research efforts. This activity allows faculty, fellows, residents, and students to learn more about the diverse ongoing research in the Pathology department. All fellows, residents, graduate students and medical students working with a faculty member who holds an appointment in the Department of Pathology are invited to submit abstracts and present posters at the poster session. Preliminary or published data in the areas of Basic Research, Translational Research and Clinical Research are presented. Awards will be presented at the Pathology Awards Ceremony in April/May. (visit PYID website)

GRADUATE STUDENT ASSOCIATION POSTER SESSION

The Graduate Student Association Poster Session is held every year. This gives the students the opportunity to showcase their research to both faculty and peers.

STUDENTS OF FACULTY WHO LEAVE THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Students whose thesis advisors/mentors have left Hopkins may continue their project under the Hopkins faculty member and graduate with a Hopkins Ph.D. if they meet all requirements. The thesis advisor/mentor must continue their financial obligations (stipend, insurances, and supplies). If a student moves out of state with the mentor, the student is still considered a Johns Hopkins graduate. The student can waive Hopkins health insurance if covered by a similar plan at the mentor's institution.
It is desirable that students working outside the country or at distant sites within the country return to Hopkins for thesis advisory committee meetings. If that is not possible, however, students will submit written progress reports yearly which will be evaluated by the thesis advisory committee. The committee will then send a written evaluation of the document to the student and place a copy of the evaluation in the student's Pathobiology file.

TRANSFER STUDENTS

Students wishing to transfer into the Pathobiology program from other programs must enter the normal admissions process. Within Hopkins, a student may transfer from another mentor to a Pathobiology faculty mentor in our program with consent of the mentor and the Pathobiology Program Director. The student has to satisfy the Pathobiology coursework requirement to be admitted as an advanced student with permission of the Pathobiology Program Director.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF STUDENTS

The Pathobiology Program provides stipend, tuition, and health and dental insurance for graduate students through their first year of study. At the beginning of the second year, the mentor assumes stipend support as well as individual medical and dental insurance for the student. Pathobiology covers the student's tuition for the duration of their studies. Students are responsible for the ongoing assessment of their student accounts and should bring any discrepancies to the attention of their Program Coordinator in a timely manner in order to correct any issues.

PATHOBIOLOGY PROGRAM COMPLETION AND SOM GRADUATION


PATHOBIOLOGY - COURSES, ROTATIONS, THESIS, ETC.

Students will take all core courses listed as required in Course Descriptions per their academic year, unless otherwise determined by the Program Directors. Students will refer to their individual academic year Student Handbooks for specific academic and procedural requirements. General Pathobiology Program and SOM requirements are stated below.

All students are expected to read and follow guidelines stated in current posted policy available at the following link: https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/som/training/graduate-programs/academics/academic-resources/policy-finder.html

LIST OF DOCUMENTS REQUIRED BY REGISTRAR FOR GRADUATION:

Documents provided by Program/Student:

  • Completion of degree requirements worksheet signed by student and program director
  • Student's CV
  • Copies of Doctoral Oral Board Exam (all attempts)
  • Abstract of Thesis
  • Names of Advisor and Reader
  • Readers Letter
  • Certificate of Completion
  • Email confirming delivery of thesis to the Library
  • Graduation Clearance Form
  • Completed Survey of Earned Doctorates
  • Proof of completion of Research Ethics requirement if not previously supplied to Registrar

Documents provided by the Registrar's office:

  • Updated Transcript

AWARD OF THE PhD DEGREE:

Johns Hopkins University - administrated by the Doctor of Philosophy Board.

From the Doctor of Philosophy Board website:
There are three fundamental requirements for the Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins University: dissertation, residence, and oral examination. None of these requirements can be modified or changed without unanimous consent of the schools and the Provost.

  1. Dissertation: All Ph.D. students must successfully complete a dissertation in accordance with relevant school and program guidelines prior to degree conferral.
  2. Residence: All Ph.D. students must have completed two consecutive semester of full-time study prior to degree conferral.
  3. Oral Examination: All Ph.D. students must successfully pass a required oral examination conducted by five faculty members. The oral examination must include the chair and at least one other member from outside the candidate's home department.

It is University policy that all Program and University requirements for the Ph.D. must be completed in 9 years or less from start of the Doctoral Program. The Doctor of Philosophy Board reviews all candidates for the Ph.D. prior to conferral to ensure that the fundamental requirements for the Ph.D. have been met within the time frame delineated.




2018 - 2019 Handbook +

Academic Performance  +

Students in the Graduate Program in Pathobiology are expected to perform at a superior level in their coursework and research. In graded courses, all grades must be at the "B" level or above. All grades in pass/fail courses must be "Pass". One grade of "C" in a graded course in an academic year will cause the student to be placed on academic probation. Two grades of "C" in required courses may lead to termination.

The Program Director will provide either written or electronic notice (e-mail) to students on academic probation. The Program Director and other faculty as appropriate will closely monitor students on probation. The condition of probation will be lifted upon successful remediation of unsatisfactory grades. The Program will continue to provide stipend and tuition during academic probation.

The Program Director will provide written notice to terminated students. Termination means that student status will be withdrawn, and stipend and tuition support will cease. Terminated students may apply for reinstatement based upon evidence of academic progress following termination. Applications for reinstatement will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the Executive Committee.

TUTORING

If a student finds that he/she has difficulty in any of the required courses, the student should contact the Pathobiology Program Coordinator immediately. The Program Director will determine if any courses need to be re-taken and will also decide if tutoring or other supportive resources are necessary. If tutoring is recommended, the Pathology Department will pay for the minimum hours required.

HONOR CODE / ETHICS

It is the joint responsibility of faculty and students of the Pathobiology program to maintain the academic integrity of the program in all respects. An ethics code provides definitions and guidelines for students to attain and maintain the highest standards of conduct. Our goal is to encourage and recognize independent thinking by all students. The ethics code requires the whole hearted support of the entire academic community, students and faculty alike, who must accept two kinds of responsibility. Each member must behave honorably and must also take action when necessary to make sure that the program is not injured by misconduct. The Pathobiology program provides a personal copy of the ethics code to every student at enrollment. Once provided with a copy the student has the responsibility of familiarizing himself/herself with the code and all its provisions. A signed copy of the code will be placed in the student's file. Violations of the code include but are not limited to cheating, plagiarism and knowingly furnishing false information about results of research.

CHEATING

Cheating is broadly defined as using or attempting to use someone else's work or ideas in a context where the student is expected to provide his own. Examples of cheating include but are not limited to:

  • Using or referring to notes, books, journal articles, devices, websites or other sources of information during an academic evaluation unless the examination is designated "open book."
  • Copying another student's answers on an academic evaluation or allowing another student to copy answers.
  • Discussing a question or exercise during an academic evaluation.
  • Acting as substitute for another or utilizing another as a substitute during an academic evaluation.

Failure to comply with the designated time limits for an academic evaluation.

PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism is defined as taking for one's own use the words, ideas, concepts or data of another without proper attribution. Plagiarism includes both direct use and paraphrasing of the words, thoughts and concepts of another without proper attribution. Proper attribution includes:

  • Use of quotation marks or single spacing and indentation for words or phrases directly taken from another source accompanied by proper reference to that source.
  • Proper reference to any source from which ideas, concepts or data are taken even if the exact words are not reproduced.

FALSE INFORMATION

Each student is required to keep a day by day record of all of his/her experiments and observations and to report his/her results fully and truthfully. Any changes made in this data record must be fully annotated and explained.


Thesis and Rotations  +

THESIS ADVISOR AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE

After the first year is completed, the student will choose an advisor from the Pathobiology faculty. After completing the Oral Examination for the Ph.D. Degree for the School of Medicine Programs, a Thesis Advisory Committee will be formed to monitor the student's thesis research progress. The student, with the consent of his/her advisor, decides on the composition of the thesis committee. The thesis committee consists of at least three experts in the student's field of study or related fields which MUST include at least one Pathobiology faculty member in addition to the student's mentor. Committee members help with research direction and technical challenges, and oversee the student's progress until research is complete and the doctorate is awarded.

  • There are no limits on the number of members on the Advisory Committee.
  • Once the committee is approved, the student contacts each of the individuals to arrange a mutually agreeable date and time for the first thesis meeting.
  • The thesis meeting is intended to help the student consider the broader concepts on which the thesis research is based, to assist in focusing on the student's research problem, and to clarify any questions concerning the experimental approach.
  • The thesis meeting generally begins with an oral progress report by the student followed by a period of questions, comments, and discussion.

Per new NIH guidelines, it is required that each student also complete an Individual Development plan with his/her mentor each year.

Students must meet with their Committee at least once per year to review progress. More frequent meetings may be desirable to assess progress in research. It is the student's responsibility to schedule these meetings. A written evaluation of the student's progress and development will be prepared by the committee, discussed with the student, and a copy placed in the student's Pathobiology file. For second year students, this meeting should involve primarily a discussion of the proposed thesis. For students in the third and subsequent years, the meeting should involve a discussion of both progress and plans for the future. The Thesis Advisory Committee will decide when the student is ready to begin writing the dissertation. A student whose advisory committee has not met at least once in a year is considered delinquent.

In the event that a student changes thesis labs, the first thesis meeting should be held no later than nine months after joining the new lab. The student, new thesis advisor, and Pathobiology Program Director will formulate a revised timeline for completion of degree based on circumstances.

In accordance with Johns Hopkins Time to Degree policy, after completion of year 6, (72 months post-matriculation), meetings must be held semi-annually at which the Pathobiology Program Director, Co-Director, or Curriculum Committee Chair must be present.

Thesis/IDP Forms


THESIS SEMINAR

The public seminar is to be presented after approval by the student's thesis committee and must be given before the student can be cleared for graduation.

PROCEDURES FOR CHOOSING ROTATIONS AND A THESIS ENVIRONMENT

  • Each student will complete 3 research rotations prior to selecting a thesis laboratory. A fourth rotation may be completed if desired.
  • Upon starting the rotation, students and their rotation mentors will complete the Rotation Plan form.
  • Upon completion of the rotation, the mentor will provide an evaluation of the student's work.
  • Students will present their rotation work at the Pathobiology Journal Club or at the annual Pathobiology retreat.
  • The 3 required rotations must be completed with Pathobiology faculty members. If a student decides to take a fourth rotation with an outside faculty member, it is with the understanding that the student will NOT be able to undertake the thesis in that lab.
  • Each research rotation will be about 3 months in length, with the exception of summer rotations. A full-time summer rotation (July-August) will be about 2 months in length.
  • The 3 required rotations must be completed during the first year.
  • The student must select a thesis advisor no later than 1 year from the date of admission to the program. A student who begins on July 1st should select a thesis lab by June 30th the year following July 1st. **In general, students will not be permitted to conduct their thesis research in a laboratory where they have been previously employed. Any exceptions to this policy will be determined by the Pathobiology Executive Committee.
  • Interim Advisors: Each student will be assigned an interim advisor during the time period between starting the program and choosing a thesis advisor. The student must meet with the interim advisor AT LEAST once every 4 months. These meetings will be initiated by the student.
  • Labs with delinquent students should be closed to rotation students until the delinquency is removed.

Rotation Forms


TRANSLATIONAL ROTATIONS

The objectives of the rotations are to give the graduate student an interactive exposure with the clinical diagnostic dimension of Pathology. The student should learn the fundamental clinical questions, the current state of the technologies to address these questions, and how basic science can be translated to advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  • The student is responsible for registering for each rotation, contacting Dr. Burns to inform her of the choice of rotation lab, and coordinating the hours for the rotation. The rotation must be approved by Dr. Kathy Burns.
  • A translational rotation should consist of eight 2-hour sessions, or a total of about 16 hours. The student and rotation advisor are responsible for coordinating these hours.
  • Each student must complete 2 translational rotations. These should be completed by the end of the student's third year.
  • At the end of the rotation, the student will fill out a translational rotation evaluation, which will be submitted to the Program Coordinator () and Dr. Burns as documentation of completion of the rotation.
  • Dr. Burns and/or the rotation advisor will assign a grade for the rotation.
  • The rotations need not require an experimental project involving bench work. If the student wishes to complete such a project, it should be decided jointly between the student and rotation advisor.
  • The student is encouraged to interact with the pathology residents and fellows. This will allow communication and strengthen ties between the Pathology residents and fellows and graduate students.
  • The content of the rotation should be decided jointly between the student and advisor. For example, recent rotations have consisted of: student observing clinical diagnosis/sign-out of CNS tumors, student learning how HLA typing is performed, student observing clinical diagnosis/sign-out of infectious disease cases, student observing residents reading frozen sections, slides, surgically resected tissue for diagnosis.

Rotation Forms


Additional Program Information  +

ORAL EXAMINATION

The oral examination tests the breadth and depth of the graduate student's scientific knowledge and readiness to begin thesis research. These exams are administered by the Pathobiology program through an oral examination committee. This preliminary oral examination will be scheduled by lottery at the end of the first year meeting with the Program Director. The exam takes place during October after the student has completed all required first year courses.

The committee will consist of 3 members and 1 alternate member selected from within the Pathobiology program faculty, and 2 members and 1 alternate member from Hopkins faculty outside the program. Faculty members are assigned randomly to serve on students' oral exam committees.

If a student fails the first oral exam, a second one will be scheduled.

STUDENTS OF FACULTY WHO LEAVE THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Students whose thesis advisors/mentors have left Hopkins may continue their project under the Hopkins faculty member and graduate with a Hopkins Ph.D. if they meet all requirements. The thesis advisor/mentor must continue their financial obligations (stipend, insurances, and supplies). If a student moves out of state with the mentor, the student is still considered a Johns Hopkins graduate. The student can waive Hopkins health insurance if covered by a similar plan at the mentor's institution.

It is desirable that students working outside the country or at distant sites within the country return to Hopkins for thesis advisory committee meetings. If that is not possible, however, students will submit written progress reports yearly which will be evaluated by the thesis advisory committee. The committee will then send a written evaluation of the document to the student and place a copy of the evaluation in the student's Pathobiology file.

SEMINARS, JOURNAL CLUBS, AND LAB MEETINGS

Graduate students are expected to attend the weekly Pathobiology Journal Clubs, and lab meetings in their mentor/thesis advisor's departments throughout their training period. Students are encouraged to attend the many seminars presented by invited speakers who are involved in cutting edge research.

PATHOBIOLOGY RETREAT

The annual Pathobiology Retreat (held in early Fall), from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. begins with a series of short research talks by senior students. Other students present posters, and several faculty members or alumni may discuss their research. Sometimes a keynote speaker will deliver a special lecture.

All members of the Pathobiology Graduate Program are expected to participate in this event. This includes Pathobiology Program Faculty, Graduate Students as well as incoming Pathology House Staff. An invitation is also extended to post-doctoral fellows affiliated with Pathobiology faculty.

PATHOLOGY YOUNG INVESTIGATORS' DAY

Young Investigators' Day (held March/April) provides residents, fellows, and students with the opportunity to present their clinical, basic, or translational research efforts. This activity allows faculty, fellows, residents, and students to learn more about the diverse ongoing research in the Pathology department. All fellows, residents, graduate students and medical students working with a faculty member who holds an appointment in the Department of Pathology are invited to submit abstracts and present posters at the poster session. Preliminary or published data in the areas of Basic Research, Translational Research and Clinical Research are presented. Awards will be presented at the Pathology Awards Ceremony in April/May.
(visit PYID website)

The Graduate Student Association Poster Session is held every year. This gives the students the opportunity to showcase their research to both faculty and peers.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

Johns Hopkins is a community committed to sharing values of diversity and inclusion in order to achieve and sustain excellence. We firmly believe that we can best promote excellence by recruiting and retaining a diverse group of students, faculty and staff and by creating a climate of respect that is supportive of their success. This climate for diversity, inclusion and excellence is critical to attaining the best research, scholarship, teaching, health care and other strategic goals of the Health System and the University. Taken together these values are recognized and supported fully by the Johns Hopkins Institutions leadership at all levels. Further, we recognize that the responsibility for excellence, diversity and inclusion lies with all of us at the Institutions: leadership, administration, faculty, staff and students.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF STUDENTS

The Pathobiology Program provides stipend, tuition, and health and dental insurance for graduate students through their first year of study. Near the beginning of the second year, the mentor assumes stipend support as well as individual medical and dental insurance for the student. Pathobiology covers the student's tuition for the duration of their studies.

TRANSFER STUDENTS

Students wishing to transfer into the Pathobiology program from other programs must enter the normal admissions process. Within Hopkins, a student may transfer from another mentor to a Pathobiology faculty mentor in our program with consent of the mentor and the Pathobiology Program Director. The student has to satisfy the Pathobiology coursework requirement to be admitted as an advanced student with permission of the Pathobiology Program Director.

VACATION POLICY

Beyond the official University holidays and breaks, students may take two weeks of vacation during the first year and three weeks of vacation during years two through seven. Under special circumstances, additional time off may be granted by mentor with concurrence of the Program Director.

ABSENCES FROM CAMPUS

All students must notify Pathobiology of any absence from campus, including vacations. If a student is in a thesis lab, the PI must be notified of an absence.

SICK LEAVE/LEAVE OF ABSENCE POLICY

Students may take fifteen calendar days of sick leave per year which can be applied to pregnancy/childbirth. Under special circumstances, this period may be extended by the Pathobiology Program Director or the sponsor. Sick leave is not accrued. For medical leave of absence, health insurance will be paid for by the program or sponsor for up to one year if requested by the student. Parental leave of sixty calendar days per year (consisting of sick/vacation and paternity leave used for the adoption or birth of a child). Either parent is eligible for leave. Parental leave is not accrued. If more time is needed, the student will be placed on leave of absence.

The graduate student must report any leave of absence to the Pathobiology program and the Registrar's office. There is a two year total limit on any leave of absence.

PROGRAM POLICY ON ABUSE AND MISCONDUCT

Policies on these issues are available on the Graduate Programs website:
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/graduateprograms/resources.cfm

GRADUATE STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND CONSULTING POLICY

Full-time graduate students are expected to devote their entire professional effort to completion of the degree requirements for their graduate programs. Accordingly, employment and/or consulting by full-time graduate students, for organizations other than Johns Hopkins University, is ordinarily not allowed. When a graduate student has completed all course work and oral exam requirements and has progressed sufficiently toward completion of the dissertation requirements, he or she may request an exception to this policy. (The procedure for initiating such a request is available in the Pathobiology office.) In no case should such an exception commit the full-time graduate student to an outside commitment in excess of sixteen (16) hours per week. Students are reminded that adherence to this policy and full written disclosure of proposed outside employment is considered part of their commitment to abide by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine honor code.




2017 - 2018 Handbook +

Academic Performance  +

Students in the Graduate Program in Pathobiology are expected to perform at a superior level in their coursework and research. In graded courses, all grades must be at the "B" level or above. All grades in pass/fail courses must be "Pass". One grade of "C" in a graded course in an academic year will cause the student to be placed on academic probation. Two grades of "C" in required courses may lead to termination.

The Program Director will provide either written or electronic notice (e-mail) to students on academic probation. The Program Director and other faculty as appropriate will closely monitor students on probation. The condition of probation will be lifted upon successful remediation of unsatisfactory grades. The Program will continue to provide stipend and tuition during academic probation.

The Program Director will provide written notice to terminated students. Termination means that student status will be withdrawn, and stipend and tuition support will cease. Terminated students may apply for reinstatement based upon evidence of academic progress following termination. Applications for reinstatement will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the Executive Committee.

TUTORING

If a student finds that he/she has difficulty in any of the required courses, the student should contact the Pathobiology Program Coordinator immediately. The Program Director will determine if any courses need to be re-taken and will also decide if tutoring or other supportive resources are necessary. If tutoring is recommended, the Pathology Department will pay for the minimum hours required.

HONOR CODE / ETHICS

It is the joint responsibility of faculty and students of the Pathobiology program to maintain the academic integrity of the program in all respects. An ethics code provides definitions and guidelines for students to attain and maintain the highest standards of conduct. Our goal is to encourage and recognize independent thinking by all students. The ethics code requires the whole hearted support of the entire academic community, students and faculty alike, who must accept two kinds of responsibility. Each member must behave honorably and must also take action when necessary to make sure that the program is not injured by misconduct. The Pathobiology program provides a personal copy of the ethics code to every student at enrollment. Once provided with a copy the student has the responsibility of familiarizing himself/herself with the code and all its provisions. A signed copy of the code will be placed in the student's file. Violations of the code include but are not limited to cheating, plagiarism and knowingly furnishing false information about results of research.

CHEATING

Cheating is broadly defined as using or attempting to use someone else's work or ideas in a context where the student is expected to provide his own. Examples of cheating include but are not limited to:

  • Using or referring to notes, books, journal articles, devices, websites or other sources of information during an academic evaluation unless the examination is designated "open book."
  • Copying another student's answers on an academic evaluation or allowing another student to copy answers.
  • Discussing a question or exercise during an academic evaluation.
  • Acting as substitute for another or utilizing another as a substitute during an academic evaluation.

Failure to comply with the designated time limits for an academic evaluation.

PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism is defined as taking for one's own use the words, ideas, concepts or data of another without proper attribution. Plagiarism includes both direct use and paraphrasing of the words, thoughts and concepts of another without proper attribution. Proper attribution includes:

  • Use of quotation marks or single spacing and indentation for words or phrases directly taken from another source accompanied by proper reference to that source.
  • Proper reference to any source from which ideas, concepts or data are taken even if the exact words are not reproduced.

FALSE INFORMATION

Each student is required to keep a day by day record of all of his/her experiments and observations and to report his/her results fully and truthfully. Any changes made in this data record must be fully annotated and explained.


Thesis and Rotations  +

THESIS ADVISOR AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE

After the first year is completed, the student will choose an advisor from the Pathobiology faculty. After completing the Oral Examination for the Ph.D. Degree for the School of Medicine Programs, a Thesis Advisory Committee will be formed to monitor the student's thesis research progress. The student, with the consent of his/her advisor, decides on the composition of the thesis committee. The thesis committee consists of at least three experts in the student's field of study or related fields which MUST include at least one Pathobiology faculty member in addition to the student's mentor. Committee members help with research direction and technical challenges, and oversee the student's progress until research is complete and the doctorate is awarded.

  • There are no limits on the number of members on the Advisory Committee.
  • Once the committee is approved, the student contacts each of the individuals to arrange a mutually agreeable date and time for the first thesis meeting.
  • The thesis meeting is intended to help the student consider the broader concepts on which the thesis research is based, to assist in focusing on the student's research problem, and to clarify any questions concerning the experimental approach.
  • The thesis meeting generally begins with an oral progress report by the student followed by a period of questions, comments, and discussion.

Per new NIH guidelines, it is required that each student also complete an Individual Development plan with his/her mentor each year.

Students must meet with their Committee at least once per year to review progress. More frequent meetings may be desirable to assess progress in research. It is the student's responsibility to schedule these meetings. A written evaluation of the student's progress and development will be prepared by the committee, discussed with the student, and a copy placed in the student's Pathobiology file. For second year students, this meeting should involve primarily a discussion of the proposed thesis. For students in the third and subsequent years, the meeting should involve a discussion of both progress and plans for the future. The Thesis Advisory Committee will decide when the student is ready to begin writing the dissertation. A student whose advisory committee has not met at least once in a year is considered delinquent.

In the event that a student changes thesis labs, the first thesis meeting should be held no later than nine months after joining the new lab. The student, new thesis advisor, and Pathobiology Program Director will formulate a revised timeline for completion of degree based on circumstances.

In accordance with Johns Hopkins Time to Degree policy, after completion of year 6, (72 months post-matriculation), meetings must be held semi-annually at which the Pathobiology Program Director, Co-Director, or Curriculum Committee Chair must be present.

Thesis/IDP Forms


THESIS SEMINAR

The public seminar is to be presented after approval by the student's thesis committee and must be given before the student can be cleared for graduation.

PROCEDURES FOR CHOOSING ROTATIONS AND A THESIS ENVIRONMENT

  • Each student will complete 3 research rotations prior to selecting a thesis laboratory. A fourth rotation may be completed if desired.
  • Upon starting the rotation, students and their rotation mentors will complete the Rotation Plan form.
  • Upon completion of the rotation, the mentor will provide an evaluation of the student's work.
  • Students will present their rotation work at the Pathobiology Journal Club or at the annual Pathobiology retreat.
  • The 3 required rotations must be completed with Pathobiology faculty members. If a student decides to take a fourth rotation with an outside faculty member, it is with the understanding that the student will NOT be able to undertake the thesis in that lab.
  • Each research rotation will be about 3 months in length, with the exception of summer rotations. A full-time summer rotation (July-August) will be about 2 months in length.
  • The 3 required rotations must be completed during the first year.
  • The student must select a thesis advisor no later than 1 year from the date of admission to the program. A student who begins on July 1st should select a thesis lab by June 30th the year following July 1st. **In general, students will not be permitted to conduct their thesis research in a laboratory where they have been previously employed. Any exceptions to this policy will be determined by the Pathobiology Executive Committee.
  • Interim Advisors: Each student will be assigned an interim advisor during the time period between starting the program and choosing a thesis advisor. The student must meet with the interim advisor AT LEAST once every 4 months. These meetings will be initiated by the student.
  • Labs with delinquent students should be closed to rotation students until the delinquency is removed.

Rotation Forms


TRANSLATIONAL ROTATIONS

The objectives of the rotations are to give the graduate student an interactive exposure with the clinical diagnostic dimension of Pathology. The student should learn the fundamental clinical questions, the current state of the technologies to address these questions, and how basic science can be translated to advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  • The student is responsible for registering for each rotation, contacting Dr. Burns to inform her of the choice of rotation lab, and coordinating the hours for the rotation. The rotation must be approved by Dr. Kathy Burns.
  • A translational rotation should consist of eight 2-hour sessions, or a total of about 16 hours. The student and rotation advisor are responsible for coordinating these hours.
  • Each student must complete 2 translational rotations. These should be completed by the end of the student's third year.
  • At the end of the rotation, the student will fill out a translational rotation evaluation, which will be submitted to the Program Coordinator () and Dr. Burns as documentation of completion of the rotation.
  • Dr. Burns and/or the rotation advisor will assign a grade for the rotation.
  • The rotations need not require an experimental project involving bench work. If the student wishes to complete such a project, it should be decided jointly between the student and rotation advisor.
  • The student is encouraged to interact with the pathology residents and fellows. This will allow communication and strengthen ties between the Pathology residents and fellows and graduate students.
  • The content of the rotation should be decided jointly between the student and advisor. For example, recent rotations have consisted of: student observing clinical diagnosis/sign-out of CNS tumors, student learning how HLA typing is performed, student observing clinical diagnosis/sign-out of infectious disease cases, student observing residents reading frozen sections, slides, surgically resected tissue for diagnosis.

Rotation Forms


Additional Program Information  +

ORAL EXAMINATION

The oral examination tests the breadth and depth of the graduate student's scientific knowledge and readiness to begin thesis research. These exams are administered by the Pathobiology program through an oral examination committee. This preliminary oral examination will be scheduled by lottery at the end of the first year meeting with the Program Director. The exam takes place during October after the student has completed all required first year courses.

The committee will consist of 3 members and 1 alternate member selected from within the Pathobiology program faculty, and 2 members and 1 alternate member from Hopkins faculty outside the program. Faculty members are assigned randomly to serve on students' oral exam committees.

If a student fails the first oral exam, a second one will be scheduled.

STUDENTS OF FACULTY WHO LEAVE THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Students whose thesis advisors/mentors have left Hopkins may continue their project under the Hopkins faculty member and graduate with a Hopkins Ph.D. if they meet all requirements. The thesis advisor/mentor must continue their financial obligations (stipend, insurances, and supplies). If a student moves out of state with the mentor, the student is still considered a Johns Hopkins graduate. The student can waive Hopkins health insurance if covered by a similar plan at the mentor's institution.

It is desirable that students working outside the country or at distant sites within the country return to Hopkins for thesis advisory committee meetings. If that is not possible, however, students will submit written progress reports yearly which will be evaluated by the thesis advisory committee. The committee will then send a written evaluation of the document to the student and place a copy of the evaluation in the student's Pathobiology file.

SEMINARS, JOURNAL CLUBS, AND LAB MEETINGS

Graduate students are expected to attend the weekly Pathobiology Journal Clubs, and lab meetings in their mentor/thesis advisor's departments throughout their training period. Students are encouraged to attend the many seminars presented by invited speakers who are involved in cutting edge research.

PATHOBIOLOGY RETREAT

The annual Pathobiology Retreat (held in early Fall), from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. begins with a series of short research talks by senior students. Other students present posters, and several faculty members or alumni may discuss their research. Sometimes a keynote speaker will deliver a special lecture.

All members of the Pathobiology Graduate Program are expected to participate in this event. This includes Pathobiology Program Faculty, Graduate Students as well as incoming Pathology House Staff. An invitation is also extended to post-doctoral fellows affiliated with Pathobiology faculty.

PATHOLOGY YOUNG INVESTIGATORS' DAY

Young Investigators' Day (held March/April) provides residents, fellows, and students with the opportunity to present their clinical, basic, or translational research efforts. This activity allows faculty, fellows, residents, and students to learn more about the diverse ongoing research in the Pathology department. All fellows, residents, graduate students and medical students working with a faculty member who holds an appointment in the Department of Pathology are invited to submit abstracts and present posters at the poster session. Preliminary or published data in the areas of Basic Research, Translational Research and Clinical Research are presented. Awards will be presented at the Pathology Awards Ceremony in April/May.
(visit PYID website)

The Graduate Student Association Poster Session is held every year. This gives the students the opportunity to showcase their research to both faculty and peers.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

Johns Hopkins is a community committed to sharing values of diversity and inclusion in order to achieve and sustain excellence. We firmly believe that we can best promote excellence by recruiting and retaining a diverse group of students, faculty and staff and by creating a climate of respect that is supportive of their success. This climate for diversity, inclusion and excellence is critical to attaining the best research, scholarship, teaching, health care and other strategic goals of the Health System and the University. Taken together these values are recognized and supported fully by the Johns Hopkins Institutions leadership at all levels. Further, we recognize that the responsibility for excellence, diversity and inclusion lies with all of us at the Institutions: leadership, administration, faculty, staff and students.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF STUDENTS

The Pathobiology Program provides stipend, tuition, and health and dental insurance for graduate students through their first year of study. Near the beginning of the second year, the mentor assumes stipend support as well as individual medical and dental insurance for the student. Pathobiology covers the student's tuition for the duration of their studies.

TRANSFER STUDENTS

Students wishing to transfer into the Pathobiology program from other programs must enter the normal admissions process. Within Hopkins, a student may transfer from another mentor to a Pathobiology faculty mentor in our program with consent of the mentor and the Pathobiology Program Director. The student has to satisfy the Pathobiology coursework requirement to be admitted as an advanced student with permission of the Pathobiology Program Director.

VACATION POLICY

Beyond the official University holidays and breaks, students may take two weeks of vacation during the first year and three weeks of vacation during years two through seven. Under special circumstances, additional time off may be granted by mentor with concurrence of the Program Director.

ABSENCES FROM CAMPUS

All students must notify Pathobiology of any absence from campus, including vacations. If a student is in a thesis lab, the PI must be notified of an absence.

SICK LEAVE/LEAVE OF ABSENCE POLICY

Students may take fifteen calendar days of sick leave per year which can be applied to pregnancy/childbirth. Under special circumstances, this period may be extended by the Pathobiology Program Director or the sponsor. Sick leave is not accrued. For medical leave of absence, health insurance will be paid for by the program or sponsor for up to one year if requested by the student. Parental leave of sixty calendar days per year (consisting of sick/vacation and paternity leave used for the adoption or birth of a child). Either parent is eligible for leave. Parental leave is not accrued. If more time is needed, the student will be placed on leave of absence.

The graduate student must report any leave of absence to the Pathobiology program and the Registrar's office. There is a two year total limit on any leave of absence.

PROGRAM POLICY ON ABUSE AND MISCONDUCT

Policies on these issues are available on the Graduate Programs website:
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/graduateprograms/resources.cfm

GRADUATE STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND CONSULTING POLICY

Full-time graduate students are expected to devote their entire professional effort to completion of the degree requirements for their graduate programs. Accordingly, employment and/or consulting by full-time graduate students, for organizations other than Johns Hopkins University, is ordinarily not allowed. When a graduate student has completed all course work and oral exam requirements and has progressed sufficiently toward completion of the dissertation requirements, he or she may request an exception to this policy. (The procedure for initiating such a request is available in the Pathobiology office.) In no case should such an exception commit the full-time graduate student to an outside commitment in excess of sixteen (16) hours per week. Students are reminded that adherence to this policy and full written disclosure of proposed outside employment is considered part of their commitment to abide by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine honor code.




2016 - 2017 Handbook +

Academic Performance  +

Students in the Graduate Program in Pathobiology are expected to perform at a superior level in their coursework and research. In graded courses, all grades must be at the "B" level or above. All grades in pass/fail courses must be "Pass". One grade of "C" in a graded course in an academic year will cause the student to be placed on academic probation. Two grades of "C" in required courses may lead to termination.

The Program Director will provide either written or electronic notice (e-mail) to students on academic probation. The Program Director and other faculty as appropriate will closely monitor students on probation. The condition of probation will be lifted upon successful remediation of unsatisfactory grades. The Program will continue to provide stipend and tuition during academic probation.

The Program Director will provide written notice to terminated students. Termination means that student status will be withdrawn, and stipend and tuition support will cease. Terminated students may apply for reinstatement based upon evidence of academic progress following termination. Applications for reinstatement will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis by the Executive Committee.

TUTORING

If a student finds that he/she has difficulty in any of the required courses, the student should contact the Pathobiology Program Coordinator immediately. The Program Director will determine if any courses need to be re-taken and will also decide if tutoring or other supportive resources are necessary. If tutoring is recommended, the Pathology Department will pay for the minimum hours required.

HONOR CODE / ETHICS

It is the joint responsibility of faculty and students of the Pathobiology program to maintain the academic integrity of the program in all respects. An ethics code provides definitions and guidelines for students to attain and maintain the highest standards of conduct. Our goal is to encourage and recognize independent thinking by all students. The ethics code requires the whole hearted support of the entire academic community, students and faculty alike, who must accept two kinds of responsibility. Each member must behave honorably and must also take action when necessary to make sure that the program is not injured by misconduct. The Pathobiology program provides a personal copy of the ethics code to every student at enrollment. Once provided with a copy the student has the responsibility of familiarizing himself/herself with the code and all its provisions. A signed copy of the code will be placed in the student's file. Violations of the code include but are not limited to cheating, plagiarism and knowingly furnishing false information about results of research.

CHEATING

Cheating is broadly defined as using or attempting to use someone else's work or ideas in a context where the student is expected to provide his own. Examples of cheating include but are not limited to:

  • Using or referring to notes, books, journal articles, devices, websites or other sources of information during an academic evaluation unless the examination is designated "open book."
  • Copying another student's answers on an academic evaluation or allowing another student to copy answers.
  • Discussing a question or exercise during an academic evaluation.
  • Acting as substitute for another or utilizing another as a substitute during an academic evaluation.

Failure to comply with the designated time limits for an academic evaluation.

PLAGIARISM

Plagiarism is defined as taking for one's own use the words, ideas, concepts or data of another without proper attribution. Plagiarism includes both direct use and paraphrasing of the words, thoughts and concepts of another without proper attribution. Proper attribution includes:

  • Use of quotation marks or single spacing and indentation for words or phrases directly taken from another source accompanied by proper reference to that source.
  • Proper reference to any source from which ideas, concepts or data are taken even if the exact words are not reproduced.

FALSE INFORMATION

Each student is required to keep a day by day record of all of his/her experiments and observations and to report his/her results fully and truthfully. Any changes made in this data record must be fully annotated and explained.


Thesis and Rotations  +

THESIS ADVISOR AND ADVISORY COMMITTEE

After the first year is completed, the student will choose an advisor from the Pathobiology faculty. After completing the Oral Examination for the Ph.D. Degree for the School of Medicine Programs, a Thesis Advisory Committee will be formed to monitor the student's thesis research progress. The student, with the consent of his/her advisor, decides on the composition of the thesis committee. The thesis committee consists of at least three experts in the student's field of study or related fields which MUST include at least one Pathobiology faculty member in addition to the student's mentor. Committee members help with research direction and technical challenges, and oversee the student's progress until research is complete and the doctorate is awarded.

  • There are no limits on the number of members on the Advisory Committee.
  • Once the committee is approved, the student contacts each of the individuals to arrange a mutually agreeable date and time for the first thesis meeting.
  • The thesis meeting is intended to help the student consider the broader concepts on which the thesis research is based, to assist in focusing on the student's research problem, and to clarify any questions concerning the experimental approach.
  • The thesis meeting generally begins with an oral progress report by the student followed by a period of questions, comments, and discussion.

Per new NIH guidelines, it is required that each student also complete an Individual Development plan with his/her mentor each year.

Students must meet with their Committee at least once per year to review progress. More frequent meetings may be desirable to assess progress in research. It is the student's responsibility to schedule these meetings. A written evaluation of the student's progress and development will be prepared by the committee, discussed with the student, and a copy placed in the student's Pathobiology file. For second year students, this meeting should involve primarily a discussion of the proposed thesis. For students in the third and subsequent years, the meeting should involve a discussion of both progress and plans for the future. The Thesis Advisory Committee will decide when the student is ready to begin writing the dissertation. A student whose advisory committee has not met at least once in a year is considered delinquent.

In the event that a student changes thesis labs, the first thesis meeting should be held no later than nine months after joining the new lab. The student, new thesis advisor, and Pathobiology Program Director will formulate a revised timeline for completion of degree based on circumstances.

In accordance with Johns Hopkins Time to Degree policy, after completion of year 6, (72 months post-matriculation), meetings must be held semi-annually at which the Pathobiology Program Director, Co-Director, or Curriculum Committee Chair must be present.

Thesis/IDP Forms


THESIS SEMINAR

The public seminar is to be presented after approval by the student's thesis committee and must be given before the student can be cleared for graduation.

PROCEDURES FOR CHOOSING ROTATIONS AND A THESIS ENVIRONMENT

  • Each student will complete 3 research rotations prior to selecting a thesis laboratory. A fourth rotation may be completed if desired.
  • Upon starting the rotation, students and their rotation mentors will complete the Rotation Plan form.
  • Upon completion of the rotation, the mentor will provide an evaluation of the student's work.
  • Students will present their rotation work at the Pathobiology Journal Club or at the annual Pathobiology retreat.
  • The 3 required rotations must be completed with Pathobiology faculty members. If a student decides to take a fourth rotation with an outside faculty member, it is with the understanding that the student will NOT be able to undertake the thesis in that lab.
  • Each research rotation will be about 3 months in length, with the exception of summer rotations. A full-time summer rotation (July-August) will be about 2 months in length.
  • The 3 required rotations must be completed during the first year.
  • The student must select a thesis advisor no later than 1 year from the date of admission to the program. A student who begins on July 1st should select a thesis lab by June 30th the year following July 1st. **In general, students will not be permitted to conduct their thesis research in a laboratory where they have been previously employed. Any exceptions to this policy will be determined by the Pathobiology Executive Committee.
  • Interim Advisors: Each student will be assigned an interim advisor during the time period between starting the program and choosing a thesis advisor. The student must meet with the interim advisor AT LEAST once every 4 months. These meetings will be initiated by the student.
  • Labs with delinquent students should be closed to rotation students until the delinquency is removed.

Rotation Forms


TRANSLATIONAL ROTATIONS

The objectives of the rotations are to give the graduate student an interactive exposure with the clinical diagnostic dimension of Pathology. The student should learn the fundamental clinical questions, the current state of the technologies to address these questions, and how basic science can be translated to advances in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  • The student is responsible for registering for each rotation, contacting Dr. Burns to inform her of the choice of rotation lab, and coordinating the hours for the rotation. The rotation must be approved by Dr. Kathy Burns.
  • A translational rotation should consist of eight 2-hour sessions, or a total of about 16 hours. The student and rotation advisor are responsible for coordinating these hours.
  • Each student must complete 2 translational rotations. These should be completed by the end of the student's third year.
  • At the end of the rotation, the student will fill out a translational rotation evaluation, which will be submitted to the Program Coordinator () and Dr. Burns as documentation of completion of the rotation.
  • Dr. Burns and/or the rotation advisor will assign a grade for the rotation.
  • The rotations need not require an experimental project involving bench work. If the student wishes to complete such a project, it should be decided jointly between the student and rotation advisor.
  • The student is encouraged to interact with the pathology residents and fellows. This will allow communication and strengthen ties between the Pathology residents and fellows and graduate students.
  • The content of the rotation should be decided jointly between the student and advisor. For example, recent rotations have consisted of: student observing clinical diagnosis/sign-out of CNS tumors, student learning how HLA typing is performed, student observing clinical diagnosis/sign-out of infectious disease cases, student observing residents reading frozen sections, slides, surgically resected tissue for diagnosis.

Rotation Forms


Additional Program Information  +

ORAL EXAMINATION

The oral examination tests the breadth and depth of the graduate student's scientific knowledge and readiness to begin thesis research. These exams are administered by the Pathobiology program through an oral examination committee. This preliminary oral examination will be scheduled by lottery at the end of the first year meeting with the Program Director. The exam takes place during October after the student has completed all required first year courses.

The committee will consist of 3 members and 1 alternate member selected from within the Pathobiology program faculty, and 2 members and 1 alternate member from Hopkins faculty outside the program. Faculty members are assigned randomly to serve on students' oral exam committees.

If a student fails the first oral exam, a second one will be scheduled.

STUDENTS OF FACULTY WHO LEAVE THE SCHOOL OF MEDICINE

Students whose thesis advisors/mentors have left Hopkins may continue their project under the Hopkins faculty member and graduate with a Hopkins Ph.D. if they meet all requirements. The thesis advisor/mentor must continue their financial obligations (stipend, insurances, and supplies). If a student moves out of state with the mentor, the student is still considered a Johns Hopkins graduate. The student can waive Hopkins health insurance if covered by a similar plan at the mentor's institution.

It is desirable that students working outside the country or at distant sites within the country return to Hopkins for thesis advisory committee meetings. If that is not possible, however, students will submit written progress reports yearly which will be evaluated by the thesis advisory committee. The committee will then send a written evaluation of the document to the student and place a copy of the evaluation in the student's Pathobiology file.

SEMINARS, JOURNAL CLUBS, AND LAB MEETINGS

Graduate students are expected to attend the weekly Pathobiology Journal Clubs, and lab meetings in their mentor/thesis advisor's departments throughout their training period. Students are encouraged to attend the many seminars presented by invited speakers who are involved in cutting edge research.

PATHOBIOLOGY RETREAT

The annual Pathobiology Retreat (held in early Fall), from 8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. begins with a series of short research talks by senior students. Other students present posters, and several faculty members or alumni may discuss their research. Sometimes a keynote speaker will deliver a special lecture.

All members of the Pathobiology Graduate Program are expected to participate in this event. This includes Pathobiology Program Faculty, Graduate Students as well as incoming Pathology House Staff. An invitation is also extended to post-doctoral fellows affiliated with Pathobiology faculty.

PATHOLOGY YOUNG INVESTIGATORS' DAY

Young Investigators' Day (held March/April) provides residents, fellows, and students with the opportunity to present their clinical, basic, or translational research efforts. This activity allows faculty, fellows, residents, and students to learn more about the diverse ongoing research in the Pathology department. All fellows, residents, graduate students and medical students working with a faculty member who holds an appointment in the Department of Pathology are invited to submit abstracts and present posters at the poster session. Preliminary or published data in the areas of Basic Research, Translational Research and Clinical Research are presented. Awards will be presented at the Pathology Awards Ceremony in April/May.
(visit PYID website)

The Graduate Student Association Poster Session is held every year. This gives the students the opportunity to showcase their research to both faculty and peers.

DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION

Johns Hopkins is a community committed to sharing values of diversity and inclusion in order to achieve and sustain excellence. We firmly believe that we can best promote excellence by recruiting and retaining a diverse group of students, faculty and staff and by creating a climate of respect that is supportive of their success. This climate for diversity, inclusion and excellence is critical to attaining the best research, scholarship, teaching, health care and other strategic goals of the Health System and the University. Taken together these values are recognized and supported fully by the Johns Hopkins Institutions leadership at all levels. Further, we recognize that the responsibility for excellence, diversity and inclusion lies with all of us at the Institutions: leadership, administration, faculty, staff and students.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT OF STUDENTS

The Pathobiology Program provides stipend, tuition, and health and dental insurance for graduate students through their first year of study. Near the beginning of the second year, the mentor assumes stipend support as well as individual medical and dental insurance for the student. Pathobiology covers the student's tuition for the duration of their studies.

TRANSFER STUDENTS

Students wishing to transfer into the Pathobiology program from other programs must enter the normal admissions process. Within Hopkins, a student may transfer from another mentor to a Pathobiology faculty mentor in our program with consent of the mentor and the Pathobiology Program Director. The student has to satisfy the Pathobiology coursework requirement to be admitted as an advanced student with permission of the Pathobiology Program Director.

VACATION POLICY

Beyond the official University holidays and breaks, students may take two weeks of vacation during the first year and three weeks of vacation during years two through seven. Under special circumstances, additional time off may be granted by mentor with concurrence of the Program Director.

ABSENCES FROM CAMPUS

All students must notify Pathobiology of any absence from campus, including vacations. If a student is in a thesis lab, the PI must be notified of an absence.

SICK LEAVE/LEAVE OF ABSENCE POLICY

Students may take fifteen calendar days of sick leave per year which can be applied to pregnancy/childbirth. Under special circumstances, this period may be extended by the Pathobiology Program Director or the sponsor. Sick leave is not accrued. For medical leave of absence, health insurance will be paid for by the program or sponsor for up to one year if requested by the student. Parental leave of sixty calendar days per year (consisting of sick/vacation and paternity leave used for the adoption or birth of a child). Either parent is eligible for leave. Parental leave is not accrued. If more time is needed, the student will be placed on leave of absence.

The graduate student must report any leave of absence to the Pathobiology program and the Registrar's office. There is a two year total limit on any leave of absence.

PROGRAM POLICY ON ABUSE AND MISCONDUCT

Policies on these issues are available on the Graduate Programs website:
http://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/graduateprograms/resources.cfm

GRADUATE STUDENT EMPLOYMENT AND CONSULTING POLICY

Full-time graduate students are expected to devote their entire professional effort to completion of the degree requirements for their graduate programs. Accordingly, employment and/or consulting by full-time graduate students, for organizations other than Johns Hopkins University, is ordinarily not allowed. When a graduate student has completed all course work and oral exam requirements and has progressed sufficiently toward completion of the dissertation requirements, he or she may request an exception to this policy. (The procedure for initiating such a request is available in the Pathobiology office.) In no case should such an exception commit the full-time graduate student to an outside commitment in excess of sixteen (16) hours per week. Students are reminded that adherence to this policy and full written disclosure of proposed outside employment is considered part of their commitment to abide by the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine honor code.





CURRENT FORMS

Registration Forms + Thesis Related Forms + Graduation Forms +

DECISION MAKING

Routine decisions concerning students and program issues are made by the Director. Policy and implementation issues, new faculty decisions, and curriculum are discussed/decided at monthly Executive Committee meetings.

FACULTY APPOINTMENTS TO THE PhD PROGRAM

Faculty membership in the Pathobiology graduate program requires participation in program activities including: teaching commitments, committee meetings, department planning, the annual Pathobiology retreat, experience in mentoring students, independent research, funding support for graduate students, and evidence of academic leadership.

FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Students are responsible for the ongoing assessment of their student accounts and should bring any discrepancies to the attention of their Program Coordinator in a timely manner in order to correct any issues.


STUDENT RESOURCES


PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT