Neuroendocrine Tumor Clinic at Johns Hopkins

Led by Drs. Kenzo Hirose and David Cosgrove, the multidisciplinary team at Johns Hopkins is dedicated to providing the best cutting-edge care to our patients with a neuroendocrine tumor (also known as an endocrine neoplasm). The team of international experts includes highly-experienced surgeons, radiologists, interventional radiologists, pathologists, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, gastroenterologists and geneticists supported by a dedicated team of nurses, nurse practitioners and physician assistants.

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  • Experience is Important

  • Meet our Team

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Welcome

The multidisciplinary team at Johns Hopkins is dedicated to providing the best cutting-edge care to our patients with a neuroendocrine tumor. The team includes highly-experienced surgeons, radiologists, interventional radiologists, pathologists, medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, gastroenterologists and geneticists supported by a dedicated team of nurses, nurse practitioners and physician assistants. Members of our team are recognized as international experts in their fields, and the team at Johns Hopkins was recently awarded the "Team Science Award," from the American Association for Cancer Research. Most importantly, we are dedicated to our patients.

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Experience Matters

The complexities of neuroendocrine tumors are best managed by caregivers with extensive experience. The disease demands it, and the team at Johns Hopkins has the experience needed. For example, neuroendocrine tumors often arise in the pancreas, and surgeons at Johns Hopkins have performed over 3,000 pancreatic resections, more than any other institution in the world. This experience matters, as a number of studies have shown that surgical volume (the number of pancreatic resections a center performs each year) is a strong predictor of patient outcome.

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News

Dr. Joanna Law and colleagues at Johns Hopkins report a new way to localize small neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas in the October issue of Surgical Endoscopy [link to PMID 23636530]. In this paper Dr. Law and colleagues show that small “fiducials” placed at the time of endoscopic ultrasound can help guide surgeons to the precise location of small neuroendocrine tumors. This more precise localization has the potential for increasing the precision of surgery and reducing the amount of pancreatic tissue that needs to be resected.

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